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Innovations in Counseling:
Working With Minority Populations


Culturally Responsive Services for Youth, Young Adults, and Families in Underserved Communities

This presentation will focus on building participants’ approaches to supporting youth and families while teaching participants how to develop cultural responsiveness. The presentation will help participants explore and reflect upon how personal values, biases, and assumptions can impact the quality of interactions between providers and youth and families. The training will also introduce attendees to a research-informed practice to help them provide culturally responsive services using the ASK Model through three main components: asking yourself questions, learning through a variety of specific activities to inform a culturally responsive approach, and asking questions of youth and families and examining organizational practices through a culturally responsive lens.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify culturally responsive approaches when working with youth and families in underserved communities.
  • Analyze the impact that personal values and biases may have on one’s ability to provide culturally responsive services to youth and families.
  • Address both individual and organizational practices to refine service delivery for underserved populations.
Michell Temple, EdD, NCC, CCTP, CRC, CTMH, LPC (GA), LPC/MHSP (TN)

Masica Jordan-Alston, EdD, LCPC, CPRS

Dr. Masica Jordan-Alston is the founder of Jordan Peer Recovery and a professor at Bowie State University. She is a licensed clinical professional counselor (LCPC) and a certified peer recovery specialist (CPRS.) In addition to her formal education, Dr. Jordan-Alston has lived experience as a peer in the recovery community, having overcome substance abuse herself as well as having lost her father and several other relatives to substance use. She has turned her pain into passion and is motivated to improve recovery for all through building the peer recovery workforce throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Dr. Jordan-Alston is also the CEO of Peerfinity, LLC, a leader in delivering personalized, culturally responsive, tech-enabled peer support to individuals diagnosed and treated for the chronic disease of addiction and mental health conditions. Peerfinity, LLC delivers a vital tele-support response to the COVID-19 pandemic by connecting survivors of the coronavirus with their lived experiences to those with symptoms, those undergoing testing, and those with a diagnosis for further support.

In addition to teaching multicultural counseling for over 10 years in collegiate settings, Dr. Jordan-Alston has presented on international platforms on race relations and has been on the front line advocating for cultural diversity and training amongst the peer recovery and behavioral health workforces. She created a proprietary educational system for developing cultural responsiveness that has been used in agencies throughout the U.S. for peers and other behavioral health professionals. Dr. Jordan-Alston regularly utilizes her in-depth expertise to facilitate workshops, seminars, management training, audits, and assessments to numerous organizations.

Q & A

Keepin’ It Real: Healing From Historical Trauma of Slavery and Segregation

This webinar will explore the history of slavery and segregation. It will look at the effects of slavery and segregation in the context of today, especially as it relates to intergenerational and racial trauma. The webinar will include discussions on microaggressions, colorism, and the four tenets of oppression perpetrated by a society that continues to devalue, degrade, and marginalize certain groups, mainly African Americans. It will challenge educators, clinicians, and practitioners to become a “voice” for students and clients who are still misjudged, mistreated, and misunderstood. It will also explore ways to help students and clients heal from the “pain of the past.”

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define historical trauma and its impact on marginalized and oppressed populations.
  • Deduce how historical and intergenerational trauma can adversely impact students’ education and clients’ treatment.
  • Decide on appropriate interventions, strategies, and tools to help students and clients heal from the past.
Lisa Connors, MA, MDiv, NCC, MAC, HS-BCP, BCC, CCTP, LBSW, LCPC

Lisa Connors, MA, MDiv, NCC, MAC, HS-BCP, BCC, CCTP, LBSW, LCPC

Lisa Connors is the associate pastor of In His Image International Ministry, Inc. She is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, National Certified Counselor, Master Addiction Counselor, Board Certified Coach, Certified Clinical Trauma Professional, and Human Services-Board Certified Practitioner, and is also certified in thanatology, the study of death, dying, and bereavement. Ms. Connors has been in the human services, social work, and counseling fields for 30 years and works tirelessly to help others reach their fullest potential in life, helping and empowering others who have been oppressed, stigmatized, marginalized, and victimized. Her greatest passion is working with individuals affected by HIV/AIDS, substance use and mental health disorders, violence, abuse, trauma, grief and loss, and racial and social injustices.

In addition to her clinical work, Ms. Connors is a professor and a member of many national organizations, including the Association for Addiction Professionals (NAADAC), American Counseling Association (ACA), National Association of Social Workers (NASW), HIV Planning Group (HPG), and Maryland Quality Management Group, and is a founding member of the Maryland Association of Addiction Professionals (MAAP). Ms. Connors was awarded the Center for Credentialing & Education’s (CCE) Professional Development Award in 2018 and the CCE Board Certified Coach (BCC) Tuition Assistance Program Scholarship in 2014. Ms. Connors holds a Bachelor of Social Work degree, Master of Divinity, and Master of Arts in professional counseling, and she is currently completing her PhD in psychology at Walden University.

Three Misconceptions About Mental Health That Prevent People From Accessing Help

Despite increased awareness of mental health and accessibility to related services, there continue to be stigmas related to seeking these services. This webinar will highlight three of the major stigmas, or misconceptions, related to mental health diagnosis and treatment and the impact these have on minority populations. Specifically, it will address and seek to debunk the misconceptions that therapy is only for “crazy” people, that asking for help is a sign of weakness, and that prayer (without mental health treatment) will heal mental health disorders. It also will provide practical tips that not only provide specific ways to address each area but can also serve as stress management strategies. By discussing and normalizing mental health, irrespective of and in conjunction with mental illness, the goal of this webinar is to highlight mental health as an important aspect of everyone’s health and not a distinct area set aside exclusively for those with a severe mental health diagnosis.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the question, “What is mental health?”
  • Identify three major misconceptions that affect mental health utilization and all aspects of one’s life—physical, emotional, and spiritual—and provide a new interpretation of these.
  • Utilize tools to address each area and provide resources for mental health treatment and advocacy.
Image of Brianna Gaynor, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist

Brianna Gaynor, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist

Brianna Gaynor, PsyD, has a passion for mental health and has noticed time and time again the healing effects of her work. Dr. Gaynor has been licensed as a psychologist in the state of Georgia since May 2011 and received her doctorate degree from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology in 2009. While in graduate school, her training focused primarily on the treatment of children, adolescents, and families. During her internship year, she was also trained in faith-based therapy and, although not a traditional Christian counselor, she has learned how to incorporate faith-based techniques for those clients who request it. She has also worked in outpatient and residential settings and in a mental health hospital.

Dr. Gaynor most enjoys the opportunity to connect with people and help encourage them through their troubles. Currently, she works at her own private practice, Peace of Mind Psychological Services, where much of her work focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of various mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, trauma, and behavioral disorders through psychological evaluations. Peace of Mind also specializes in helping the whole family “find peace in every circumstance” by providing therapy services starting at age 3 through adulthood. Dr. Gaynor has a unique way of connecting with others through humor and kindness, and her goal in every encounter is to help others.

Q & A

Who’s Doing Time? Incarceration and the Community

Incarceration rates in the United States are at an all-time high, with the U.S. leading the world’s incarceration rate. On any given day, there are about 2.2 million individuals behind bars. As counselors, we will more than likely work with children and family members of incarcerated individuals. Despite the growing rate of incarceration, we don’t talk about it enough in the counseling profession. Often, counselor education programs do not provide the necessary information regarding incarceration and its effects. In this webinar, we will examine the trauma of incarceration at individual and collective levels. We will also discuss the ripple effects of incarceration, such as family separation, economic decline, and shame.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the trauma of incarceration.
  • Identify two effects of incarceration on families and communities.
  • List two ways to support families and communities affected by the trauma of incarceration.
Image of Alice Mills Mai, MA, NCC, LMHC

Alice Mills Mai, MA, NCC, LMHC

Alice Mills Mai is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in the state of New York and a National Certified Counselor (NCC). Ms. Mills Mai was born and raised in Ghana and currently lives in the Bronx, New York. She works full-time as a clinical supervisor for the Criminalized Survivors Program (CSP) at STEPS to End Violence and also practices in private practice and as a consultant for Centering Wholeness LLC. She supervises a team of counselors at Rikers Island and in the community who offer comprehensive clinical and legal support services to survivors of intimate partner violence or other forms of gender-based violence and who have been criminalized for their efforts to survive or resist abusive partners. Ms. Mills Mai created Centering Wholeness, LLC to celebrate the humanity in each one of us through consultation with an agency working with survivors of any form of violence. Her counseling practice is rooted in tenets of multiculturalism, Black feminist theories, and relational-cultural therapy.

Ms. Mills Mai is currently a doctoral student studying counselor education and supervision at the University of the Cumberlands. She holds a BA in psychology and a MA in mental health counseling from the City College of New York. She was a 2018/2019 Beyond the Bars Fellow at the Center for Justice at Columbia University. Her research interests include incarceration, trauma, state/structural violence, vicarious resilience, social justice in counseling, and counselor wellness, and her dissertation will focus on vicarious resilience and counselors’ wellness.

A Clinician’s Ethical Responsibility to Reduce Cultural, Sexual, and Gender Identity Microaggressions

A microaggression is a subtle discriminating attitude, belief, behavior, or omission based on stigmatized minority differences such as race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, or ability. Microaggressions are often outside the conscious awareness of the perpetrator or could even be well-intended, as a result of cultural privilege, underlying tensions, cultural bias, and prejudicial beliefs. The cumulative effect of microaggressions can be incredibly impactful. This is especially true in a clinical setting, where microaggressions could have a chilling effect on seeking future health care services, resulting in missed screenings, late interventions, and poorer health outcomes.

During this interactive presentation, participants will learn how to advocate for reducing cultural, sexual, and gender identity microaggressions. Participants will develop skills for informing health care administrators, providers, and policymakers on best practices and practical ways for reducing or eliminating microaggressions in their health care setting. Throughout the webinar, participants will explore what microaggressions look like, define appropriate terminology for addressing issues pertinent to sexual and gender identity minorities, and critically reflect on their own potential cultural biases.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Develop awareness on how to identify microaggressions in a clinical setting.
  • Introduce ways to reduce microaggressions and build a better understanding of cultural differences between sexual orientation, gender identity, and other intersecting identities.
  • Engage in critical self-reflection in an effort to reduce the risk of committing a microaggression.
Jeff Peterson, PhD, NCC, LCPC, LPC, PCC

Jeff Peterson, PhD, NCC, LCPC, LPC, PCC

Dr. Jeff Peterson is an assistant professor in the School of Education and Counseling at Wayne State College in Wayne, Nebraska. Previously, he taught at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs; Avila University in Kansas City, Missouri; and Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Dr. Peterson is a licensed clinical professional counselor (LCPC) and counselor supervisor in the states of Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, and Utah.

Dr. Peterson served as the Chi Sigma Iota faculty advisor for the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs chapter and has been heavily involved in promoting multicultural inclusivity/advocacy within the classroom. Over the past year, he served as a faculty mentor for Quad, a joint university collaboration between the United States Air Force Academy, Colorado College, and the University of Colorado, developing best-practices for in-school suicide prevention/intervention programming. Dr. Peterson currently serves on the editorial review board for the American Counseling Association’s Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling and is the co-founder and organizer of the Healthcare Guild, a national non-profit organization dedicated to helping sexual and gender minorities find affirming and culturally competent health care. In addition to presenting at both national and regional conferences, Dr. Peterson is also a national presenter for PESI and Good Therapy.

Q & A

Beyond Basic Needs: Counseling and Support for Foster Youth During a Crisis

Counselors working with children and adolescents in foster care must recognize that these youth need more than their basic needs met during difficult times. Keeping these needs in context is especially pertinent during a crisis. If counselors understand what these varying needs are, they can continue to help foster youth toward the path of adult self-sufficiency upon exiting the foster care system. This webinar will help counselors understand the psychological and self-fulfillment needs of foster youth beyond their basic, physiological needs utilizing Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a conceptual framework. Join to learn more about how counselors can provide better support for foster youth and their foster families during challenging times.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three challenges foster youth experience as a result of a crisis.
  • Recognize the physiological and self-fulfillment needs of foster youth during a crisis.
  • Identify at least three approaches to providing support for foster youth and their families during challenging situations.
Regina Gavin Williams, PhD, NCC, LCMHC (NC)

Regina Gavin Williams, PhD, NCC, LCMHC (NC)

Dr. Regina Gavin Williams is a counselor educator at North Carolina Central University, a National Certified Counselor (NCC), and a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor (NC). She holds a PhD in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, an MEd in school counseling from Valdosta State University, and a BS in psychology with a minor in women’s studies from the University of Georgia. Dr. Williams has worked in a variety of settings, including community mental health, student affairs, and telemental health counseling. Her research focuses on the adult self-sufficiency of adolescents aging out of the foster care system, training therapeutic foster caregivers, and assisting adolescents with postsecondary education and career decision-making. She also has a passion for providing spaces of support for mothers of color, having served as co-creator/co-chair of a local conference, Hear Our Voices: Advocacy for Mothers of Color. Dr. Williams is the 2019–2020 recipient of the Chi Sigma Iota Distinguished Alumni Award (Nu Sigma Chi Chapter - NC State) and a 2016 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Doctoral Fellow.

Twanna Monds, MEd, LCMHCA, NBCT

Twanna Monds, MEd, LCMHCA, NBCT

Twanna Monds is an upper school counselor and chair of health and wellness at Cary Academy in Cary, North Carolina. Before joining Cary Academy, she worked as a college instructor at Durham Technical Community College and as a public school educator for 16 years. Ms. Monds received her undergraduate degree from Indiana University and an MEd in school counseling from the University of Cincinnati. She is currently pursuing her PhD at North Carolina State University. She is a National Board Certified Teacher and Licensed Clinical Mental Health Associate, and she has a certificate as a Career Development Facilitator. She is on the Advisory Board for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Caregiving Youth Project and served as a delegate for the North Carolina School Counselor Association. Ms. Monds has presented on various topics in the field of counseling throughout the country. Her research interests include youth caregivers, African American women with disabilities, and developing school-based mental health programs.

Disrupting Educational Spaces: Using School-Based Mentoring Programs to Center African American Males as Public Intellectuals

In this presentation, those working in K–12 education will develop and extend their knowledge supporting the idea of mentoring and school-based mentoring programs, particularly programs that center or focus their attention on African American males. The presentation will provide participants with an opportunity to create and produce knowledge; engage in reflective conversations supporting best practices to successfully implement school-based mentoring programs; and engage in educational practices that combine students’ homes, schools, and communities into spaces of learning. This will be explored by employing the idea of effectiveness theory, critical race theory, and culturally relevant pedagogy.

Additionally, participants will engage in critical, brave, and meaningful conversations pertaining to African American males, their ideas of school, and an educational system that is in crisis. Participants will also be provided an opportunity to engage in shared experiences, a sense of community, and scholarship that is focused on dismantling oppressive social systems for all marginalized groups. The presenter will share his use of the Successful Team Aimed at Reaching Student Success (STARSS) mentoring program for African American males implemented in a traditional high school setting to illustrate and unpack the successes and challenges of mentoring. Finally, he will discuss the idea of cultural pluralism, confronting a culture of whiteness, school funding and school accountability measures, and the idea of protecting African American males at all costs.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the benefits of mentoring and the idea of theory as their conversations are guided by practitioners who have implemented mentoring and ideas of theory into an intentional practice.
  • Empathize with the human condition and affirm the narratives regarding many of the lived experiences of African American males in our high schools throughout the United States.
  • Utilize researched recommendations to combat social systems that leave many African American males marginalized and disconnected within collective spaces.
Elbert Hawkins

Elbert Hawkins, III, PhD, NCC, NBCT

Dr. Elbert Hawkins III is a professional school counselor with 17 years of experience in K–12 education. Currently, he serves as the counselor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Moss Street Partnership School, a laboratory school serving diverse learners in grades K–5. Dr. Hawkins holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and a minor in cultural anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, a Master of Science degree in counselor education from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and a doctorate in educational studies and cultural foundations from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Additionally, Dr. Hawkins is a National Certified Counselor and a National Board Certified Teacher with a concentration in school counseling/early childhood through young adulthood. Dr. Hawkins centers his counseling practice in social justice learning and education, equity and inclusion, and community and collaborative partnerships. He aligns himself with this African Proverb, "If you want to go fast go alone, but if you want to go far go together."

Q & A

COVID-19–Related Stress in Health Care Workers

This webinar will help professionals manage the stress associated with working in the times of COVID-19. They will learn how to manage their COVID-19–related stressors and will be empowered to emerge healthy and well during and after the pandemic.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe causes and symptoms of COVID-19–related stress.
  • Develop tools to enhance their wellness at work and in their personal lives.
  • Create a plan to ensure their effectiveness at work and at home.
Martha Teater

Martha Teater, NCC, LPC (CO), LCAS (NC), LMFT (NC)

Martha Teater is a board certified counselor, licensed professional counselor, licensed marriage and family therapist, and licensed clinical addictions specialist. In private practice in western North Carolina since 1990, she now lives in Denver, Colorado, and provides telehealth in North Carolina and Colorado. She has worked in integrated care, community mental health, addictions, medication assistance program, and free clinic settings. She has provided trainings in 49 states and internationally on topics such as COVID-19 stress, behavioral treatment of chronic pain, compassion fatigue, and trauma. Martha has published 175 articles in newspapers and magazines, including Family Therapy Magazine, and Psychotherapy Networker. She is the co-author of Overcoming Compassion Fatigue: A Practical Resilience Workbook and Treating Chronic Pain: Pill-Free Approaches to Move People from Hurt to Hope.

Q & A

Teaching Wellness, Self-Care, and Empathy to Multicultural Students

This webinar will describe a wellness-focused learning series presented in a graduate-level writing course for international students specifically covering the topics of wellness, self-care, and empathy. The presenter will describe particular programmatic components in the series, as well as the benefits of integrating wellness issues with a diverse population.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Address three challenges to implementing a wellness program with diverse students.
  • Identify three discussion questions to prompt discussion of wellness-related issues with diverse students.
  • Name three resources to help build wellness programming for diverse students.
Lauren Chase

Lauren Chase, MS, NCC, LPCA

Lauren Chase is currently working toward a PhD in counselor education and supervision at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ms. Chase is a Licensed Professional Counselor Associate (NC) and a National Certified Counselor. She holds a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Georgia State University in Atlanta, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of West Georgia in Carrollton. Ms. Chase is currently a graduate assistant at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her education and professional career have been focused on children and families with an emphasis on child-centered play therapy. She has worked in a variety of settings, including community mental health, a high school, university disability services, a homeless shelter, and a residential facility. Ms. Chase has won awards for her commitment to the field of suicide prevention and for promoting creativity in the counseling profession. Her research interests center on trauma, play therapy, and multicultural issues.

Q & A

Improving Coping Flexibility Within the Context of Chronic Disease and Disability

Coping flexibility refers to one’s ability to effectively self-monitor and modify coping behaviors based upon situational demands and coping resources that are accessible and available to produce favorable outcomes. This dynamic process is essential for overall health and well-being. For individuals living with chronic disease and disability, the use of adaptive or effective coping strategies has been associated with improved disease management and symptom reduction. Conversely, maladaptive or ineffective coping strategies have been linked to long-term interpersonal and emotional distress. The difficulties and losses associated with having a chronic condition reveal that more needs to be done to help people who are living with chronic disease and disability adjust to changes they experience throughout the course of their disease in addition to managing their everyday lives. Counselors can take an active role and help individuals living with chronic health conditions self-monitor their coping patterns and acquire more adaptive strategies to address individual, interpersonal, and systemic factors that contribute to their stress burden.

In this webinar, we will discuss the development of a brain-based wellness program and examine its effect on the coping efforts of participants living with chronic disease and disability. More specifically, this webinar will highlight the effectiveness of an eight-week Brain-Based Education and Wellness (BE WELL) intervention with African American women living with multiple sclerosis (MS).

In the counseling profession, we assist clients with developing and carrying out their self-determination goals, and this intervention study is a demonstration of this collaborative counseling approach. Furthermore, this study promotes the need for more diversity and customization in clinical research to make counseling interventions more generalizable and inclusive to ensure better health outcomes for people living with chronic conditions.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe and define coping flexibility and its significance within the context of chronic disease and disability.
  • Identify the seven mental activities from the Healthy Mind Platter and how they contribute to overall wellness.
  • Explore the outcomes of an N of 1/ABA single-subject experimental design study.
Whitney G. McLaughlin

Whitney G. McLaughlin, PhD, MA, NCC, LCMHC

Dr. Whitney G. McLaughlin has counseling experience that includes working with diverse populations in school, mental health, college, and career settings. Dr. McLaughlin serves as a counselor in private practice; Global Ambassador with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; and a reviewer for the only scholarly publication devoted entirely to college students’ health, the Journal of American College Health. She was named the 2019 recipient of the Don C. Locke Multicultural and Social Justice Award by the College of Education at North Carolina State University.

Dr. McLaughlin holds a PhD in educational leadership, policy, and human development - counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, an MA in clinical mental health counseling from Wake Forest University, and a BA in sociology from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a board certified counselor and licensed clinical mental health counselor. Dr. McLaughlin’s research focuses on holistic wellness, neuro-informed mental health counseling, evaluating coping processes, integrated care, racial disparities in mental health, and professional competency (with a focus on cultural competence). Dr. McLaughlin resides in Raleigh, North Carolina. She actively engages in conducting workshops and trainings locally, nationally, and internationally. She is currently working with primary care physicians and neurologists to develop chronic care interventions for underserved communities.

Q & A

“Take Your Kung-Flu Back to Wuhan”: Counseling Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders With Race-Based Trauma Related to COVID-19

Following the 2019 global outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), reports of discrimination and violence against Asians and Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have increased substantially. These experiences of xenophobia, sinophobia, and race-based discrimination have deleterious effects on the emotional and physical well-being of AAPI individuals. This engaging and relevant webinar presentation will outline the clinical implications of counseling AAPI clients while identifying the need to decolonize current trauma-focused interventions. Attendees will obtain a deeper understanding of how protective factors can mitigate the effects of racial discrimination and will learn culturally relevant strategies to heal race-based trauma in AAPI client populations.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the effects of racial discrimination and microaggressions on the well-being of AAPI groups.
  • Obtain a deeper understanding of the protective factors that can mitigate the effects of racial discrimination.
  • Engage in culturally sensitive counseling interventions that may be helpful for working with AAPI clients who present with race-based trauma.
Stacey Diane A. Litam

Stacey Diane A. Litam, PhD, NCC, CCMHC, LPCC

Dr. Stacey Litam is an assistant professor of counselor education at Cleveland State University. Dr. Litam is a researcher, counselor educator, and social justice advocate on topics related to human sexuality, sex trafficking, Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) concerns, and the phenomenological experiences of individuals with intersecting marginalized identities. As a scholar, Dr. Litam’s research has been published in prestigious journals such as The Professional Counselor, Journal of Sexual Aggression, and Journal of Child Sexual Abuse. She has facilitated over 70 refereed presentations at the national, regional, and state levels and actively contributes to peer-reviewed publications in journals, books, and edited volumes. Her professional interests encompass human sexuality, human trafficking, decolonizing the model minority stereotype, and the influence of internalized racism and intra-ethnic othering on Asian American identity development.

Q & A

Exploring Lived Experiences Through the History and Culture of Asian America

Individuals who identify as Asian and Asian American are often labeled as the model minority, perpetual foreigner, or the invisible minority. Though innocuous on the surface, research has shown these perceptions to have negative effects on mental health, help-seeking behaviors, and well-being. In addition, these labels can minimize the experiences of Asians who have immigrated to the United States as refugees from the situations in their countries of origin. This presentation aims to shed light on the various therapeutic approaches in counseling Asian and Asian American trauma clients along with addressing cultural and societal barriers to treatment.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast theoretical and therapeutic approaches when counseling clients who identify as Asian and/or Asian American.
  • Identify the need to explore the experiences of Asian and Asian American clients and construct effective interventions when working with trauma.
  • Analyze the different ways the media and sociocultural variables can impact Asian and Asian American clients and their presenting problems.
Lawrence Richardson

Lawrence Richardson, MS, NCC, LPC

Lawrence Richardson earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology and his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Oklahoma State University. In 2015, he was named an NBCC Minority Fellowship Program Fellow. Currently, he provides individual, group, and family counseling at Grand Lake Mental Health Center, which is an integrated behavioral health center specializing in rural mental health. Formerly, he worked in the higher education, social services, and non-profit sectors. Richardson was also privileged with the opportunity to develop and instruct Oklahoma State University’s first Asian American studies course. Mr. Richardson lives in a 420-square-foot tiny home in Stillwater, Oklahoma, with his husband and two dogs.

Q & A

Identifying Anger vs. Rage in Minorities

The climate in the United States has drastically changed within the last decade. There has been an increase in outward expressions of anger and rage toward others in social situations in which multiple cultures are represented. This training will help participants recognize the difference between anger and rage in minority clients. It will also address the effects of societal triggers that decrease appropriate anger management practices, which may lead to explosive rage reactions. Participants will be able to identify therapeutic approaches to meet their clients where they are in their response system and assist them with incorporating skills to decrease maladaptive rage response to daily stressors.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the difference between anger and rage when working with minority clients.
  • Recognize various societal triggers that move an anger response to a rage reaction.
  • Explore therapeutic strategies to assist clients with reducing anger-to-rage responses.
Candice Norris-Brown

Camille D. Grier, MS, NCC, LPC, CPCS

Camille D. Grier is a licensed professional counselor in Georgia with over 13 years of experience working as a professional counselor and life coach, and she has been in private practice since 2009. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in sociology from Georgia State University in 2001 and a graduate degree in community counseling from Mercer University in 2005. Ms. Grier is a National Certified Counselor, Certified Professional Counseling Supervisor, EAP certified provider, and Military Certified Family STARR provider. She has provided Certified Professional Counseling Supervision training for licensed professionals seeking certification, and she has presented trainings in the workplace, schools, and community organizations.

Ms. Grier has worked with clients with a wide range of concerns, including depression, anxiety, relationship issues, parenting problems, career challenges, and severe and persistent mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar, major depression with psychosis). She also has helped many people who have experienced physical trauma or emotional abuse. She is an interactive, solution-focused therapist, and her therapeutic approach is to provide support and practical feedback to help clients effectively address personal life challenges. Ms. Grier integrates complementary methodologies and techniques to offer a highly personalized approach tailored to each client. She believes it takes courage to seek a more fulfilling and happier life and to take the first steps toward change. With compassion and understanding, she works with individuals to help them build on their strengths and attain the personal growth they are committed to accomplishing.

Q & A

Culturally Responsive Trauma Practices for Members of the Hispanic/Latinx Population

This webinar explores ways counseling professionals can expand their knowledge regarding the unique challenges faced by members of the Hispanic/Latinx population. Trauma-informed counseling practices include: safety from physical harm and re-traumatization, an understanding that symptoms are contextual and vary according to life experience and culture, and an understanding that symptoms are adaptive attempts to cope and survive the traumatic event(s) rather than maladaptive behaviors indicating that something is wrong with the client.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate strategies to make counseling culturally sensitive to the values of the Hispanic/Latinx culture.
  • Identify interventions that are considered best practices for counseling Hispanic/Latinx clients.
  • Recognize how Hispanic/Latinx clients express distress from traumatic events.
Candice Norris-Brown

Candice Norris-Brown, PhD, NCC, ACS, LPC

Candice Norris-Brown is an assistant professor at Indiana Wesleyan University in the graduate Counseling Department. Dr. Norris-Brown has a Doctor of Philosophy in counseling and student personnel services from the University of Georgia, an Educational Specialist in school and guidance counseling from the University of Georgia, a Master of Science in clinical psychology from Virginia State University, and a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Virginia State University. She holds credentials as a licensed professional counselor in Georgia and Virginia and is an Approved Clinical Supervisor and National Certified Counselor. She also serves as a gatekeeper to the profession by providing clinical supervision to doctoral students. Dr. Norris-Brown’s current interests include advocating for students with disabilities and marginalized groups that experience systemic barriers, group work, professional identity development of professional school counselors, and issues related to diversity and social justice in education and counseling.

Q & A

Engaging Communities of Color in Therapy With Technology

Therapy was once limited to “talk therapy” only, with little emphasis placed on outside tools or support. But using effective tools to address mental health concerns can make all the difference. It is critical for helping professionals to be equipped with a variety of tools when addressing the needs of diverse populations. We can no longer deny the impact that technology has on everyone. Technology can assist with expanding the ability to assist underserved populations, who would not otherwise have access to specialized services. Technology can serve as a bridge to connect various populations with the help that is needed. Often, therapists, social workers, and others in the helping fields shy away from technology. However, technology is here to stay, and this presentation will empower professionals to utilize technology while adhering to ethical guidelines. Participants will learn how to leverage technology in the therapy room with consideration for multicultural implications.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two ways the use of technology impacts therapy with individuals of diverse cultures.
  • Identify at least two evidence-based telemental health approaches that are effective with culturally diverse populations.
  • Summarize two ways in which clients respond to the use of technology by therapists, social workers, and others in the helping professions.
Marquita Johnson

Marquita Johnson, MDiv, NCC, BC-TMH, LPC, CPCS

Marquita Johnson is a graduate of Mercer University with a Master of Science in community counseling and a Master of Divinity with a concentration in pastoral counseling. Ms. Johnson received her undergraduate degree from Georgia State University in psychology and sociology. Currently, Ms. Johnson is a second-year doctoral student in counselor education and supervision at Walden University. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor, National Certified Counselor, Board Certified–Telemental Health Provider, and Certified Professional Counseling Supervisor. In addition to those roles, Ms. Johnson serves as a graduate assistant at Walden University and is the learning community chair for Chi Sigma Iota. With over a decade of experience in mental health, Ms. Johnson most recently served as a college counselor at SCAD-Atlanta and Georgia State University, where she worked with millennials at various stages of life. Ms. Johnson has a private practice located in the heart of Atlanta, Millennial Counseling, Coaching, and Consulting. Her specialties include working with concerns including dating, divorce, step-families, and grief related to loss in relationships, and she especially enjoys her work with millennials.

Q & A

The Other Side of the Rainbow—Cultural Sensitivity and the LGBTQ Community

Civil rights laws have promoted the inclusion of all cultural groups, including the LGBTQ community. However, various circumstances have created barriers for clinicians to know, understand, and support members of this unique community. Through this webinar, participants will have the opportunity to learn ways to effectively work with members of the LGBTQ community while also increasing their knowledge on terms, appropriateness, and techniques that are effective in individual and couples-based clinical sessions.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize their ethical responsibility in working with the LGBTQ community and incorporate ways to market their services to this unique population.
  • Increase their technical knowledge (skills, vocabulary, interventions, and techniques) in working with members of the LGBTQ community.
  • Utilize resources to work with all members of the LGBTQ community, including the children of same-sex parents.
LaNail R. Plummer

LaNail R. Plummer, EdD, NCC, ACS, BC-TMH, LCPC (MD), LPC (DC)

As a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC-MD), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC-DC), and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), Dr. LaNail R. Plummer is committed to improving the lives of many through mental health and character development. Through the values of integrity and awareness, Dr. Plummer believes that emotional, spiritual, and cultural healing is attainable.

Dr. Plummer and her team of counselors specialize in child-centered play therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, and solution-focused therapy. As a graduate of Howard University and Marymount University, Dr. Plummer ensures that her clinical sessions incorporate cultural frameworks as a method of self-awareness, processing, and healing.

As a counselor, Dr. Plummer is passionate about being a guide to her clients. She has over 13 years of clinical experience that spans variations in clients ages 3+, co-parenting, couples, and families. Additionally, her work can be tailored to support the individual and couple-based needs of members of the LGBTQ community while also allowing for the role of spirituality and meaning.

As a presenter, Dr. Plummer enjoys sharing her knowledge of clinical frameworks and counseling, clinical supervision, small business/private practice start-ups, and spiritual techniques and implications in therapeutic sessions. As such, Dr. Plummer has presented at many international and national conferences, including the European Branch of the American Counseling Association (EB-ACA), the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi), and the Maryland Counseling Association (MCA). Additionally, Dr. Plummer has presented insightful mental health tips and commentary on local and national media outlets, including ABC7, NBC4, and CNN.

As a small business minority (Black, woman, U.S. Army veteran) owner, Dr. Plummer believes in a cumulative approach to mental health, business development, and balanced living. Dr. Plummer is the co-founder and owner of EMC2 Mental Health Counseling and Educational Consulting. She, and her team of nine Black women counselors and three educational specialists, operate 34 offices in Washington D.C. Dr. Plummer is also a full-time faculty member at Johns Hopkins University.

Q & A

Integrating Culture Into Child-Centered Play Therapy

This webinar will discuss the basic concepts of child-centered play therapy and the needs of minority cultures with regards to child-centered play therapy (CCPT). This webinar makes the case that CCPT is culturally inclusive to minority cultures and will give techniques for providers to be culturally inclusive and help advocate for their clients in minority cultures.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the nine categories of CCPT responses.
  • Describe three techniques used in order to be more culturally inclusive to minority cultures.
  • List three challenges that children in minority cultures may face when using CCPT.
Kristy Christopher-Holloway

Lauren Chase, MS, NCC, LPCA

Lauren Chase is currently in the PhD program in counselor education and supervision at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ms. Chase is a Licensed Professional Counselor Associate (North Carolina) and a National Certified Counselor. She holds a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Georgia State University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of West Georgia. Ms. Chase is currently a graduate assistant at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and a private practice clinician providing play therapy services to children and families in Gastonia, North Carolina.

Ms. Chase’s education and professional career have focused on children and families using a child-centered approach. She has worked in a variety of settings, including community mental health, high school, university disability services, homeless shelter, and residential facility. She supervises students in play therapy and teachers in child–teacher relationship training and assists in play therapy courses at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She served on Chi Sigma Iota International’s Community Engagement Committee from 2016 to 2019. Ms. Chase has won awards for her commitment to the field of suicide prevention and for promoting creativity in the counseling field. Her research interests center on trauma, play therapy, and multicultural issues.

Q & A

Treating Grief in Black Women With Infertility and Reproductive Loss

This webinar focuses on issues related to perinatal grief and loss in African-American women experiencing reproductive loss and infertility. Applying social justice and feminist frameworks, participants will also receive effective and culturally adaptive clinical strategies that promote positive treatment outcomes in grieving infertile African-American women experiencing reproductive loss.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe and define infertility and its impact on African-American women.
  • Discuss various forms of perinatal grief related to reproductive loss and infertility in African-American women.
  • Apply various culturally adaptive treatments and interventions that promote positive treatment outcomes in infertile African-American women experiencing reproductive loss.
Kristy Christopher-Holloway

Kristy Christopher-Holloway, EdD, NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC

Dr. Kristy Christopher-Holloway is an assistant professor at Lindsey Wilson College, the founder and director of New Vision Counseling Center, LLC, a group private practice in Douglasville, Georgia, that offers affordable outpatient mental health counseling, and the founder of New Vision Consulting and Training, LLC. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Georgia, a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC), and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS).

Dr. Christopher-Holloway earned her Bachelor of Science in psychology from Louisiana State University-Shreveport, her Master of Science from Georgia State University, and her doctoral degree in counselor education and supervision from Argosy University-Atlanta, where her research focused on the mental health help-seeking experiences of religious or spiritual African-American women diagnosed with infertility, as well as the psycho-emotional impact of infertility.

Dr. Christopher-Holloway has presented at conferences, workshops, and trainings locally, nationally, and internationally with focuses on African-Americans and mental health, the psycho-emotional impact of infertility in African-American women, addressing religion and spirituality in the counseling session, counselor multicultural competence, the strong Black woman syndrome and generational trauma, operating a successful private practice, incorporating wellness in clinical practice, and more.

Q & A

The Psychology of Millennials

Millennials range in age from 18 to 34, and represent a generation of people who are true multitaskers. But this results in difficult issues that can play into the health of millennials. This generation is cognitively overloaded with information and suffering from what is called ambition addiction and choice-overload, all of which results in high levels of stress. They may appear to have less patience than past generations and be more self-focused, wherein they do not want social control and obligations from binding relationships. They typically believe in taking independent decisions and want to take charge of the adult levels of responsibilities only when they feel the need to it. They spent most of their time on networking in a virtual world. They have poor sleeping habits and get fewer of hours of sleep than generations past. With increasing stress levels, irritability and anger are rampant. About 19% of millennials suffer from depression and anxiety. They tend to take this stress out on family and friends. It is also reasonable to assume that these stress levels place millennials right in the middle of destructive health issues.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Learn to identify millennials, and compare their views, needs, expectations, and attitudes to those in other generations.
  • Understand basic expectations that are common across the millennial generation and how to manage expectations.
  • Explore strategies for helping this generation move from stress perceptions to achieving success.
Camille D. Grier, MS, NCC, LPC, CPCS

Camille D. Grier, MS, NCC, LPC, CPCS

Camille D. Grier has been a Licensed Professional Counselor in Georgia with over 13 years of experience working as a professional counselor and life coach. Ms. Grier has been in private practice since 2009. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in sociology from Georgia State University in 2001. Ms. Grier received a graduate degree in community counseling from Mercer University in 2005. She is a National Certified Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor, Certified Professional Counseling Supervisor, EAP certified provider, and Military Certified Family STARR provider. Ms. Grier has provided Certified Professional Counseling Supervision training for licensed professionals seeking certification. She has presented trainings in the workplace, schools, and community organizations.

Ms. Grier has worked with clients with a wide range of concerns, including depression, anxiety, relationship issues, parenting problems, career challenges, and severe and persistent mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar, major depression with psychosis). She also has helped many people who have experienced physical trauma or emotional abuse. She is an interactive, solution-focused therapist. Her therapeutic approach is to provide support and practical feedback to help clients effectively address personal life challenges. Ms. Grier integrates complementary methodologies and techniques to offer a highly personalized approach tailored to each client. She believes it takes courage to seek a more fulfilling and happier life and to take the first steps toward change. With compassion and understanding, she works with each individual to help them build on their strengths and attain the personal growth they are committed to accomplishing.

Q & A

Integrity vs. Despair: Identifying Depression in Older Clients

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 7 million American adults over the age of 65, or about 17% of that age group, experience depression each year. Although depression later in life is becoming more prevalent, it is not a normal part of aging. This training provides a closer look at the manifestation of depression in older clients and the symptoms that may be overlooked or incorrectly attributed to other factors related to aging.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize symptoms, risk factors, and causes of depression in elderly clients.
  • Differentiate between grief, depression, and dementia.
  • Explore clinical interventions, supports, and self-initiated activities that have been effective for addressing symptoms.
Lynell Howard, PhD, NCC, LPC, CPCS

Lynell Howard, PhD, NCC, LPC, CPCS

Dr. Lynell Howard has been providing psychological counseling and consulting services for over 20 years. She began her career as a member of a private group practice where she engaged in clinical counseling and psychometric assessment. She later established an independent practice and has served numerous counseling and consulting clients in small and large organizations, including the US Armed Services, public school districts, state government, and the private sector. She has interests in military mental health, trauma, research, and organizational training.

In 2016 Dr. Howard founded Howard Harris & Associates, LLC, which specializes in providing professional training and development for behavioral health providers and other professionals. A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, and current resident of Lawrenceville, Georgia, she holds licenses as a professional counselor in both Georgia and Louisiana and has been a practicing consultant and clinician in various settings. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Tulane University, master’s degree in clinical psychology from Midwestern State University, and doctorate in industrial/organizational psychology from Capella University. She is a board certified counselor and has provided training and consulting services across the U.S., Europe, and Asia.

Q & A

Addressing Addiction Treatment Barriers in Minority Communities

It has been reported that people of color (POC) do not go to counseling, do not maintain engagement in the counseling process, and/or do not participate in counseling research. Likewise, it has been reported that many members of rural communities (RCs) and diverse cultural groups (DCGs) engage in addiction treatment at lower rates.

This webinar explores the myths and facts surrounding these and other statements that purport these beliefs. More importantly, this webinar focuses on identifying and addressing some of the specific emotional, cultural, and systemic barriers to addiction treatment faced by members of minority communities.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three common factors that may hinder POC and members of RCs and DCGs from seeking professional assistance for addiction treatment.
  • Describe three economic factors and how they may hinder POC and members of RCs and DCGs from seeking professional assistance for addiction treatment.
  • Recognize three systemic-related outcomes that have negatively impacted the participation of POC and members of RCs and DCGs in seeking addiction treatment.
  • Identify and discuss two specific barriers that negatively impact members of LGBTQIA communities seeking addiction counseling.
  • Describe three methods for increasing the engagement of POC and members of RCs and DCGs in addiction treatment.
Robert A. Horne, PhD, MDiv, NCC, MAC, ACS, LCAS, LPC, CSI, ICAADC

Robert A. Horne, PhD, MDiv, NCC, MAC, ACS, LCAS, LPC, CSI, ICAADC

Robert A. Horne serves as an assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Allied Professions and Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate at North Carolina Central University. Additionally, Dr. Horne serves as a counselor and counseling consultant in private practice; former chair of the NBCC Foundation Minority Fellowship Program Advisory Council (doctoral); a subject matter expert for the International Credentialing and Reciprocity Consortium; and the fitness for practice evaluator for the North Carolina Board of Licensed Professional Counselors. Dr. Horne holds a PhD in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, an MA in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and a Master of Divinity from Duke University. He is a National Certified Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor, Approved Clinical Supervisor, Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist, Certified Clinical Supervisor Intern, International Certified Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor, and Master Addictions Counselor. Additionally, Dr. Horne is an NBCC and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Fellow.

Dr. Horne’s research and publications focus on males of African descent’s identity development and sustenance; the relationship between spirituality, mental health, and substance use; racial fatigue, stress, and coping strategies; and the development of professional and paraprofessional counselor training and supervision in international settings among underserved populations. Dr. Horne resides in Durham, North Carolina, and has visited over 40 countries. He actively engages in conducting workshops and trainings, both nationally and internationally. He is currently working with mental health and substance abuse organizations in Uganda, South Africa, and the Caribbean to develop mental health and addiction training programs in underserved communities.

Q & A

Effective Interaction With Military, Minority, and Marginalized Clients Who Have Service Animals

Once used primarily for guide and mobility work, service dogs are increasingly used to support individuals with a variety of disabilities. Unfortunately, the majority of service dog handlers also report discrimination and negative interactions while in public. This is partly due to a lack of quality information and many myths and misconceptions about the use of service animals, even among counselors and other professionals.

As service animals become more common, it is vital that counselors be well informed on the issues surrounding service animal use. Counselors may find themselves in a prescribing role for clients seeking service dogs through programs, and it is very likely that counselors will encounter service dog teams in their work. This creates an exciting opportunity for counselors to engage in advocacy and to ensure that others within the profession are informed about and able to support this growing demographic.

In this webinar we will discuss the definition of a service animal, what they do, and how a client might go through the process of acquiring a service animal. We will also explore some common experiences of handlers and discuss how to work with an individual who has a service animal in a respectful, informed manner.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the difference between a service animal, emotional support animal, and therapy animal, and the role of each type.
  • Describe access rights for service dog teams as outlined under the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as proper etiquette for interacting with a team.
  • Explore how to work with a client who has a service dog, the basics of when a service dog may be appropriate, and how to navigate the placement process.
  • Recognize common barriers handlers encounter and identify advocacy opportunities.
Image of K. Lynn Pierce, MS, NCC

K. Lynn Pierce, MS, NCC

K. Lynn Pierce is a National Certified Counselor and a 2017 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program awardee. She has a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Georgia State University. Ms. Pierce currently lives in State College, Pennsylvania, and is pursuing her PhD in counselor education and supervision at The Pennsylvania State University. She has work experience with trauma, sexual and affectional minorities, and individuals with disabilities, and much of her interest is in how intersecting identities may impact marginalized and minority individuals.

From the start of her counseling education, a strong focus for Ms. Pierce has been research and education around service animals. Ms. Pierce is a service dog handler of four years, and she has built a consultation and education presence designed to support mental health and other related professionals in recognizing the factors that contribute to the mental health and wellness of clients with service animals. She specializes in assisting professionals with interpreting the laws applicable to service dog teams, interacting with service dog handlers in positive ways, and forming therapeutic alliances through knowledge and understanding.

Q & A

The Significance of Holidays, Anniversaries, and Other Triggers of Grief in the African-American Community

Grief is a universal response to a loss. However, there are unique and unshared losses that are faced by members of the African-American community. There are social, cultural, political, and historical factors that may influence the grieving process for African-Americans and often alienate this already underserved community in the mental health care system. Many grievers are unaware of the various factors that can trigger their grief journey.

In this webinar, we will provide an overview of grief, physical and symbolic losses, and how anniversaries, holidays, and other triggers impact African-Americans as they navigate loss.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Provide an overview of the grief process.
  • Recognize physical and symbolic losses.
  • Describe triggers of grief for the African-American community.
  • Identify how to navigate resources to assist clients in navigating the grief journey
Image of Ajita M. Robinson

Ajita M. Robinson, PhD, NCC, LCPC-S

Dr. Ajita Robinson has a Bachelor of Science in business administration and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology with a minor in Spanish, and she went on to complete a Master of Arts (Research) in counseling and human development at Saint Louis University. Dr. Robinson initially moved to Washington D.C. to finish a degree in law but ultimately decided to pursue a doctorate in counselor education at the George Washington University. While obtaining her PhD, she completed a post-master’s certification in grief and loss and a fellowship in neurodevelopmental disabilities at Children’s National Medical Center.

Dr. Robinson has over 15 years of experience serving individuals, families, and communities. She specializes in creating safe environments where one can begin to heal from life’s hurts and live a fuller life. In addition to being the Founder and Clinical Director of Friends in Transition Counseling Services, a mental health practice located in Bethesda, Maryland, CEO of Dr. Ajita Robinson, a consulting agency where she serves as an income strategist for small business owners, and CEO of Mastering Insurance, LLC, a credentialing and billing agency, she is an assistant professor in the Counseling Department at Argosy University in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Robinson has traveled the country providing workshops, trainings, and consultations to a variety of audiences, including mental health professionals, families, educational institutions, communities impacted by crisis, students, and many more.

Q & A

Adolescent Minorities and Suicide Risk: 15 Things We Often Miss

Although we, as a society, have gotten better with the topic of suicide, it still remains taboo in some communities. Sadly, when we do talk about it, we tend to leave out adolescents of ethnic minority status who face special challenges because of their race and ethnicity, access to resources, and lack of community support.

For many ethnic minority youth struggling with suicidal ideation, things take an even darker turn when suicide-contagion becomes a community-wide concern. Ethnicities of all cultures are struggling with this rarely recognized epidemic.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the cultural, emotional, psychological, societal, familial, and traumatic factors that often cause teens of all ethnic groups to consider the irreversible act of suicide.
  • Discuss the influence and “power” of suicide contagion in the American, Native American, and African-American cultures.
  • Describe the important role parents, teachers, and mental health professionals play in the understanding and prevention of teen suicide.
  • Recognize the 15 things we all tend to miss when trying to understand adolescent suicide.
Image of Támara Hill

Támara Hill, MS, NCC, CCTP, LPC

Támara Hill is a licensed therapist and certified clinical trauma professional in private practice who specializes in working with children and adolescents who suffer from mood disorders, trauma, suicidal thoughts, and disruptive behavioral disorders.

Ms. Hill earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology, a minor certification in forensic science, and her Master of Science in counseling from Chatham University. She also attended semesters at Carnegie Mellon and Carlow University. After graduating, Hill began working with underprivileged kids in a variety of settings, including schools, community centers, juvenile delinquency programs, residential treatment facilities, and hospitals in rural and inner city areas.

Over the past 11 years of consulting with parents, families, and caregivers and treating suffering youths internationally, Ms. Hill realized a strong need for navigation through the muddy waters of the mental health system. During that time, she became certified in trauma therapy through the International Association of Trauma Professionals, and she developed her private practice, Anchored Child & Family Counseling in Pleasant Hills, Pennsylvania, to serve needy families.

Ms. Hill credits her career passion to a “divine calling,” and she is internationally recognized for corresponding literary works as well as appearances on radio and other media platforms. She is an author, family consultant, and founder of Anchored-In-Knowledge. Visit her on Twitter or YouTube.

Q & A

A Culture of Stigma: The African-American Woman and Mental Health

Although African-American women are burdened with mental health issues, their use of mental health services is low. “I don’t have time for that” or “I can handle it” are all too familiar responses that an African-American woman may make to explain why she doesn’t seek help for herself. This lack of attention to her mental health has detrimental effects for the African-American community as a whole. In this webinar, we will discuss the pertinent issues relevant to the African-American woman and her struggle to address and overcome mental health problems. The intersection of history, the “Strong Black Woman” concept, stigma, mistrust of the mental health field, and lack of culturally responsive mental health treatment reveals the factors that keep this population of women from accessing the services that they need most.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the role that history, the “Strong Black Woman” concept, stigma, mistrust of the mental health field, and lack of culturally responsive mental health treatment have in limiting the African-American woman’s capacity to address her mental health problems appropriately.
  • Recognize the impact that the lack of effective mental health treatment for African-American women has on the African-American community as a whole.
  • Explore their role as helpers in reducing the barriers to effective mental health treatment for the African-American woman.
Image of Shana D. Lewis

Shana D. Lewis, PhD, NCC, LPC-S

Dr. Shana D. Lewis is a National Certified Counselor and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She is a 2014 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program Awardee and currently sits on the MFP Master’s Advisory Council. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Houston, a master’s degree in counseling psychology from Troy State University, and a PhD in counselor education from Sam Houston State University. Dr. Lewis is the owner and clinical director of Living Well Professional Counseling Services, PLLC, a private practice counseling agency in Bellaire, Texas, where she specializes in treating women and adolescent girls. She is also the founder of Her VOICE, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering survivors of domestic violence through mentorship and education. Additionally, Dr. Lewis has over 17 years of experience working in the mental health field serving a variety of populations.

Dr. Lewis is also a sought after keynote and motivational speaker, trainer, and leader in the quest against intimate partner violence and other women’s issues. She delivers powerful, high-energy keynotes to audiences all across the country about a variety of issues, including domestic violence, women’s issues, spiritual issues, mental health issues, and transformation. As a result of her expertise in these areas, Dr. Lewis has been featured on several local media outlets, including Great Day Houston, Houston Life, Magic 102.1, Amazing 102.5 FM, and 93.7 The Beat.

Dr. Lewis has authored two books. Get Your Life! The 90 Day Journal and Get Your Life! The Blueprint are both designed to guide readers toward transformation by teaching the key areas that must be addressed in order to “create the life you want today.”

Q & A

An Ecological Theory: School Counselors’ Effectiveness With African-American Boys With Disabilities

This webinar will explore the results of a grounded theory study related to school counselors’ effectiveness with African-American boys with “disabilities,” who are disproportionately represented in special education. The phenomenon of overrepresentation of African-American boys in special education is an historical problem that has not been addressed by professional counselors. An ecological theory and a conceptual model for school counselors who work with African-American boys with disabilities will be presented based on data collected from school counselors in North Carolina.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of the educational crisis of African-American boys with “disabilities.”
  • Identify school counselors’ perceptions of and effectiveness in their work with this population.
  • Discuss theory grounded in data from school counselors who work with African-American boys with “disabilities.”
Christopher Townsend

Christopher B. Townsend, PhD, NCC, LPC, LCAS, CCS

Christopher B. Townsend graduated with his bachelor’s degree in psychology (1996) and master’s degree in agency counseling (1998) from Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. He has been a practitioner for 20 years. On April 10, 2018, Dr. Townsend successfully defended his dissertation, entitled A Grounded Theory Study on School Counselors’ Perception and Effectiveness with African American Boys with Disabilities, Who Are Disproportionately Represented in Special Education, at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro, North Carolina. He is currently an assistant professor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in the Department of Clinical Counseling and Mental Health. Dr. Townsend is a national and international trainer, specializing in addictions, children’s trauma, and other psychiatric disabilities. His research agenda includes topics related to social justice, domestic and international trauma, and addictions.

Q & A

Staying Clinical, Staying Ethical, and Staying Legal in Immigrant Hardship Assessment and Evaluation

This webinar will explore the different types of hardship evaluations licensed professional counselors may conduct as a part of their clinical practice. The webinar will serve as a primer regarding the different types of immigration evaluations such as: Hardship, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), Cancellation of Removal, Asylum, T Visa (human trafficking), and U Visa (victims of crimes). The webinar will also discuss legal and ethical considerations while undertaking such evaluations.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the types and functions of hardship evaluations and assessments professional counselors can conduct for immigrants and qualifying United States citizens.
  • Discuss ethical and legal issues in writing hardship assessments for immigrant clients.
  • Integrate popular psychometric inventories and tests to strengthen evaluations.
George J. Ramos Jr., MA, NCC, LMHC

George J. Ramos Jr., MA, NCC, LMHC

George Ramos is a board certified counselor (NCC) and Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York City. Mr. Ramos earned a Bachelor of Arts in psychology with a minor in disaster studies and a Master of Arts in mental health counseling from Nyack College’s Alliance Graduate School of Counseling. Additionally, he is a third-year doctoral student at the University of the Cumberlands and a 2017 NBCC MFP Doctoral Fellow. Mr. Ramos also is an adjunct professor at Mercy College and Nyack College.

Mr. Ramos worked with at-risk families with the Administration for Children Services for New York City for 10 years as a child protective specialist. He trains child welfare professionals with the City University of New York and is the president of Best Practice Trainers, Inc. Currently, he practices in-home mental health counseling and conducts hardship evaluations for immigration court proceedings at his private practice, In-Home Wellness Mental Health Counseling and Assessment, and he provides mental health consulting for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. His research interests are professional counselors’ perceived self-efficacy to perform in-home counseling and counselors’ ability to write immigration hardship evaluations.

Q & A

How Can Hip-Hop Culture and Rap Music Inform Counseling With African-American Men?

Aside from a few noteworthy examples, very little exists within the extant counseling literature base on how hip-hop culture and rap music can be utilized with Black boys or Black men in therapy. To address this dearth in the counseling discourse, this webinar seeks to illuminate how innovative counselors can integrate hip-hop culture and rap music into individual counseling interactions with Black men to discuss salient social issues that interfere with their holistic optimum development (e.g., hypercriminalization and hyperincarceration). Literature examining the history of hip-hop culture and how rap music has been used therapeutically with Black men will be discussed. Additionally, this webinar will connect some of the overlooked and marginalized content within hip-hop culture and rap music to the themes of social justice that undergird and pervade the counseling profession.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss and describe the sociopolitical terrain of the United States in the 1960s and 1970s (e.g., uprisings in protest of police brutality and chronic underemployment) and how this context inspired the emergence of hip-hop culture and rap music.
  • Draw parallels between the aforementioned sociopolitical terrain of the 1960s and 1970s that helped burgeon hip-hop culture and rap music and the caustic sociopolitical climate that Black men must navigate today.
  • Connect themes (e.g., organizing and resisting redlining in urban communities) espoused by various hip-hop and rap artists with conceptual models of social justice counseling published in respected counseling journals. By making these connections, counselors are better equipped to examine structural barriers that impact the lives of Black men in therapy.
Ahmad Rashad Washington, PhD, NCC

Ahmad Rashad Washington, PhD, NCC

Dr. Ahmad Washington is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling and Human Development at The University of Louisville. He teaches in the school counseling program where he works with preservice school counseling students as they prepare to transition into the profession. Dr. Washington received his BS in psychology from Francis Marion University, his MA in clinical counseling from Webster University, and his PhD in counselor education and supervision from the University of Iowa in 2013. He is the co-editor of the recent book, Black Male Student Success in 21st Century Urban Schools: School Counseling for Equity, Access and Achievement. Dr. Washington has received various counseling-related awards recognizing his work, including the First Annual Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development Asa Hilliard Scholarship Award (2009). His primary research interests are social justice counseling and hip-hop school counseling. In particular, he is interested in exploring how, and under what circumstances, school counselors engage students in conversation about issues of social injustice through the multifaceted lenses of hip-hop culture. Dr. Washington’s most recent article, titled “Using Hip-Hop Culture and Rap Music in Counseling Black Men,” was recently published in the Journal of Counseling & Development, the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the counseling profession, and it is the featured article on the American Counseling Association website. When Dr. Washington is not working, he enjoys reading, listening to music, practicing Brazilian jiu jitsu, and spending quality time with his friends and wife, Dr. Marta N. Mack-Washington.

Q & A

Couples Counseling With the LGBTQ Community

Traditionally, couple therapy models have been heteronormative and pathologizing of nontraditional relationship structures. There is a lack of research on evidence-based effective couple therapy with those in the LGBTQ community. This webinar will analyze the history of LGBTQ relationships. Multicultural issues will be addressed in the context of couple therapy and the LGBTQ community. In addition, research on couple therapy will be analyzed and couple therapy models will be identified along with the barriers to couple therapy. Specific interventions that can be effective with LGBTQ couples will also be assessed.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define what it means to be “LGBTQ Affirmative.”
  • Describe specific couple therapy models.
  • Conceptualize specific couple therapy techniques and interventions.
Yamonte Cooper

Yamonte Cooper, EdD, NCC, LPCC, CST

Dr. Yamonte Cooper is an associate professor of counseling at El Camino College and an adjunct professor of human sexuality at California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS), Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC), National Certified Counselor (NCC), and AASECT Certified Sex Therapist (CST) in private practice in Los Angeles. He specializes in sex therapy with individuals and couples, relational dynamics, and marital therapy. Further, Dr. Cooper is a gender specialist and an LGBTQ Affirmative Therapist whose work includes working with diverse individuals. He addresses issues of discordant desire, infidelity in couples, sexual dysfunctions, gender and orientation confusion, and sexual compulsivity.

Dr. Cooper is a trauma expert (EMDR, Somatic Experiencing®, neurofeedback, and TF-CBT), employing multiple modalities and interventions with clients suffering from trauma. Further, he specializes in working with couples utilizing Gottman Method couples therapy (Levels 1, 2, and 3), emotionally focused therapy (EFT), and collaborative couple therapy.

Dr. Cooper is an expert on issues of diversity and has authored and co-authored articles and a book chapter addressing working with various populations. He was recently featured in a CNN article, “Why Your Sex Drive Is in Low Gear.” Further, Dr. Cooper was honored with a prestigious Fulbright International Education Administrator Seminar Award in Germany where he exchanged best practices in career counseling and development and best practices with higher education institutions in Botswana. He was recently awarded a Diversity Initiative Award from the National Career Development Association (NCDA).

Q & A

Opioid Abuse and Addiction: Multicultural Assessment and Treatment Approaches, Part 2

Despite the great challenges the opioid crisis exacts on American society, there are many evidence-based, effective, and multiculturally sound screening, assessment, diagnostic, and treatment approaches for today’s practicing counselors. This webinar will expand on “Opioid Abuse and Addiction: Multicultural Assessment and Treatment Approaches, Part 1” by exploring in greater depth the skills and strategies needed for effective evaluation and treatment of opioid addiction. Special consideration will be given to psychological interventions, motivational interviewing, and medical treatments, such as buprenorphine therapy for opioid withdrawal. Multicultural considerations will inform all treatment approaches discussed, such as how to integrate diversity into treatment and common barriers faced by minority clients. The presentation aims to increase the understanding of opioid evaluation and treatment though a multicultural lens.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Survey the broad spectrum of effective and multiculturally sound evaluation and treatment approaches for opioid addiction.
  • Conceptualize specific, evidence-based psychological and medical-based interventions for opioid addiction.
  • Describe multicultural issues within the broad practice of opioid evaluation and treatment, with specific focus on how to incorporate multicultural sensitivity into one’s counseling practice.
Todd F. Lewis

Todd F. Lewis, PhD, NCC, LPC

Dr. Lewis is an associate professor of counseling and counselor education at North Dakota State University. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Dr. Lewis is past treasurer and president of the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors (IAAOC), a division of the American Counseling Association, and previously served as the IAAOC representative on the Governing Council of the American Counseling Association.

Throughout his career, he has taught graduate-level students in motivational interviewing (MI), addictions and substance abuse, counseling theory, behavior change, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Dr. Lewis has presented on these topics at many local, state, national, and international venues. He has published numerous research articles related to behavior change, substance abuse, collegiate drinking, and theoretical approaches to addictions treatment and MI. He has twice received the Exemplary Research Award from IAAOC for his research. In 2014, he wrote his first textbook, entitled Substance Abuse and Addiction Treatment: Practical Application of Counseling Theory, published by Pearson Education. He has been a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) since 2012, and he regularly teaches and conducts courses and workshops teaching and modeling beginning and advanced MI. Dr. Lewis has been active on research teams that have secured both internal and external funding for his work. In addition to his full-time faculty work, Dr. Lewis has garnered significant clinical experience where he has coordinated substance abuse clinical research and treatment services with clients struggling with a range of substance use problems.

Q & A

Opioid Abuse and Addiction: Multicultural Assessment and Treatment Approaches, Part 1

Experts agree that the United States is in the throes of an opioid epidemic, as recent estimates suggest that over 2 million Americans have either abused or become addicted to prescription pain medication or illicit opioid drugs. Effective evaluation, diagnostic, and treatment strategies are needed, especially those that incorporate multicultural theory and perspectives. This webinar will explore opioid abuse and addiction in America by explaining the common effects of opioid drugs and why they can be so dangerous and addictive. Common misperceptions about opioid addiction also will be discussed. The webinar will feature key multicultural issues to consider within the evaluation process and how to assess and diagnose opioid addiction taking these into account. The presentation aims to increase the attendee’s understanding of opioid addiction through a multicultural lens and the services counselors can provide to assist in client recovery.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the full range of effects in the opioid drug category, including general effects, effects of overdose, and withdrawal symptoms, and why and how these drugs become so addictive.
  • Recognize the scope of the opioid crisis in America and the common misperceptions about opioids that help fuel full-blown addiction.
  • Conceptualize the proper evaluation of opioid addiction through a multicultural lens, with specific attention to screening, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment.
Todd F. Lewis

Todd F. Lewis, PhD, NCC, LPC

Dr. Lewis is an associate professor of counseling and counselor education at North Dakota State University. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Dr. Lewis is past treasurer and president of the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors (IAAOC), a division of the American Counseling Association, and previously served as the IAAOC representative on the Governing Council of the American Counseling Association.

Throughout his career, he has taught graduate-level students in motivational interviewing (MI), addictions and substance abuse, counseling theory, behavior change, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Dr. Lewis has presented on these topics at many local, state, national, and international venues. He has published numerous research articles related to behavior change, substance abuse, collegiate drinking, and theoretical approaches to addictions treatment and MI. He has twice received the Exemplary Research Award from IAAOC for his research. In 2014, he wrote his first textbook, entitled Substance Abuse and Addiction Treatment: Practical Application of Counseling Theory, published by Pearson Education. He has been a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) since 2012, and he regularly teaches and conducts courses and workshops teaching and modeling beginning and advanced MI. Dr. Lewis has been active on research teams that have secured both internal and external funding for his work. In addition to his full-time faculty work, Dr. Lewis has garnered significant clinical experience where he has coordinated substance abuse clinical research and treatment services with clients struggling with a range of substance use problems.

Q & A

Understanding Acculturative Stressors With Refugee and Immigrant Populations

The migration trajectory can be a complex process. Although the resettlement process is three-fold—consisting of premigration, migration, and postmigration—this webinar will explore the process in which immigrants and refugees experience postmigration. The presentation will examine the acculturative stressors associated with the postmigration process that individuals may experience. Specific challenges and their influence on the immigrant’s mental health will also be discussed. Lastly, the attendees will examine how immigrants and refugees cope and adapt with acculturative experiences in their host country. This presentation aims to increase the attendees’ understanding of the cultural changes and adaptation of immigrants and refugees.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the acculturative stressors that immigrant and refugee individuals experience.
  • Recognize the mental health challenges associated with the adjustment process (helping the clients label his or her stressors/emotions).
  • Summarize coping strategies and resources to assist immigrants and refugees in their acculturative process.
Lotes Nelson

Lotes Nelson, PhD, NCC, LPC, ACS

Dr. Lotes Nelson is a clinical faculty member at Southern New Hampshire University. She received her PhD in counselor education and supervision and her MS in mental health counseling from Walden University. She received her BS in management from Montreat College.

Dr. Nelson is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a North Carolina Board Approved Supervisor, an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), and a National Board for Certified Counselor (NBCC) Minority Fellow. As a counselor, she provides individuals, couples, and family counseling in her private practice. She is passionate about serving the underserved and never-served populations, especially individuals who have migrated to the United States or are refugees adjusting to life in the mainstream. Dr. Nelson maintains her strong advocacy involvement in both her immediate community and nationally, and she continues to raise mental health awareness by engaging in professional conference presentations and providing mental health wellness workshops. Her areas of expertise include multiculturalism with emphasis on understanding the influence of acculturation; counselor education and supervision; eating disorders; and various areas of adolescent mental health.

Dr. Nelson is a member of the following professional associations: American Counseling Association (ACA), serves on the Branding Committee and a Conference Proposal Reviewer; Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), conducts Conference Proposal Reviews; Association for Humanistic Counseling (AHC); Chi Sigma Iota (CSI), Omega Zeta Chapter, served as a Chapter Faculty Advisor and a Chapter Faculty Advisory Committee Member; Licensed Professional Counselors Association of North Carolina (LPCANC); North American Society of Refugee Healthcare Providers; and Southern Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (SACES). Dr. Nelson also holds an active volunteer role with the NBCC Foundation.

When she is not involved in her professional work, Dr. Nelson enjoys spending quality time with her husband and son. As a family, they enjoy traveling together.

Q & A

History, the Bible, and Counselors Helping LGBT Clients

Spirituality and religion can be protective factors for mental health clients. For clients who are struggling with the intersection of their religion/spirituality and their sexual orientation, their beliefs and places of worship can be marginalizing. This webinar seeks to discuss this intersection and how religion/spirituality can impact therapy. It will also discuss the “clobber passages” in the Bible that have been used to speak against homosexuality and place them in their literary, historical, and cultural context. It will also discuss how narrative therapy can be used to intervene when clients present with conflict due to their religion/spirituality and their sexual orientation.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the intersection of religion/spirituality and sexual orientation.
  • Discuss the impact that religion/spirituality can have on therapy.
  • Discuss the “clobber passages” and put them in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts.
  • Provide clinical interventions for working with individuals experiencing conflict due to the intersection of religion/spirituality and sexual orientation.
Julius Ford

David Julius Ford, Jr., PhD, NCC, LPC, ACS

David Julius Ford, Jr. holds a BA in psychology and an MA in clinical mental health counseling, both from Wake Forest University. In May 2014, he earned his PhD in counselor education and supervision at Old Dominion University. Dr. Ford is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in North Carolina and Virginia. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Ford recently completed his third year as an assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Graduate Psychology at James Madison University, where he serves as the faculty adviser to the Nu Lambda chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and the JMU Gospel Choir.

Dr. Ford’s professional interests are Black Greek life; multicultural issues; college students; African-American males in higher education; addictions counseling; supervision; group work; qualitative research; the LGBTQQIA community; intersectionality; and persons living with HIV/AIDS. He has experience as an instructor for undergraduate human services courses and has taught graduate courses on career counseling, testing and assessment, clinical mental health counseling, addictions counseling, practicum supervision, and group counseling. He has also taught a doctoral-level dissertation course and a doctoral-level course in grant writing and program evaluation. He is one of 24 inaugural fellows of the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Ford is a classically trained pianist and is a proud and active member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. As an undergraduate, he had the privilege of taking a class taught by the late Dr. Maya Angelou. Dr. Ford currently lives in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Q & A

Bridging the Cultural Gap Between Korean Immigrant Parents and Their 1.5 and 2.0 Korean-American Children: Understanding Cultural Differences Between the East and the West

Immigration can be a difficult experience for anyone, but navigating two different worlds poses a threat when the two worlds are found to be antithetical to each other. Immigrant parents of Korean descent often transition to the U.S. with a singular goal in mind—to achieve the American Dream through and for their children—yet they are hardly prepared to face the realities of cultural conflicts that come as a direct result of their children's changing cultural identities. This webinar will contextualize immigration of Koreans within the backdrop of Korean history; dissect salient social and emotional issues Korean immigrant families face; pinpoint the inevitable cultural clash between the East and the West; and suggest bicultural identity as a healthy option of adjustment.

  • Increase understanding of salient issues impacting Korean immigrant families;
  • Become familiar with the cultural differences between the East and the West; and
  • Gain perspective on biculturalism and healthy cultural adjustment for Korean-American youth.
Josephine Kim

Josephine M. Kim, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Josephine M. Kim has a dual faculty appointment in the Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Dental Medicine and in the Prevention Science and Practice/CAS in Counseling at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is also on faculty at the Center for Cross-Cultural Student Emotional Wellness at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in the state of Massachusetts and a National Certified Counselor whose clinical skills and experiences span many contexts including residential facilities, hospitals, community agencies and public and private schools. She has provided professional consultation and expertise on multicultural, mental health and educational issues to various media sources in Asia and in the U.S. and is a former resident fellow in the Administrative Fellowship Program at the Office of the Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity and Equity at Harvard University. She is the director of diversity and inclusion at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and her research and practice focus on diversity, inclusion, equity, and bridging the cultural gap between immigrant generations and their 1.5 and 2.0 American children. She is the author of two bestselling books in Korea: The Secret of Children's Self-esteem: A Handbook for Parents and Self-esteem in the Classroom: A Handbook for Teachers.

Q & A

What Counselors Need to Know When Working With Transgender Men

How do transgender men experience their sexual orientation and gender identity during the transition process? Results of a qualitative study of these topics will be presented in this session, including portions of interviews with members of this population. From their words and their experiences, you will hear what transgender men believe we, as counselors, should know about their experiences. The session will conclude with an interactive discussion on the fluid and binary nature of sexual and gender identities in transgender men.

  • Working with the narratives of transgender men from a recent study, the intersectionality of gender and sexual identities will be discussed.
  • The webinar will include the stories of transgender men—how they see counseling, what they want counselors to know about them, and how they see themselves regarding sexual and gender identities.
  • The presentation will also address the fluid and binary nature of sexual and gender identities in transgender men.
William Baker

William B. Baker, Ph.D.

William B. Baker recently earned a Ph.D. in counseling at Montclair State University and currently works as an adjunct professor in counselor education at Montclair State. Dr. Baker has been researching transgender men, with a focus on sexual orientation and gender identity issues and how these two constructs intersect. He is a strong advocate for LGBTQ persons and has recently been focusing on the “T,” transgender persons, who are often overlooked or misunderstood. Dr. Baker has 30 years of experience in education, which includes teaching, counseling and working with “at-risk” students in alternative and adult schools.

Dr. Baker received a M.A. in school counseling from Montclair State University. He is also a Licensed Associate Counselor (LAC) in the state of New Jersey. Dr. Baker has presented about transgender men at various counseling conferences and has recently presented in a corporate setting, BASF in New Jersey, about being inclusive with transgender employees.

Q & A

Spirituality in Clinical Practice

Historically, the relationship between religion/spirituality (R/S) in clinical practice has been tolerant at best and contentious at worst. In recent years, clinicians and researchers have recognized religion, spirituality and nonreligious beliefs to be important aspects of the identities and life experiences of many individuals, groups and families. In this webinar, we will explore the role and impact of religion, spirituality and nonreligious belief systems on people’s lives. We will also review ways to address R/S in counseling and psychotherapy, whether spirituality is at the core of the client’s presenting concern or R/S is an aspect of the client’s identity but not the presenting issue. Paramount to this work is each clinician’s awareness of their own R/S beliefs and journey as an aspect of competent, ethical and culturally responsive professional practice.

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of religion, spirituality and nonreligious belief systems to mental, physical and emotional health;
  • Describe how their own spiritual path influences their counseling practice; and
  • Identify at least three tools that can be used to address religious and spiritual issues with clients.

Kathy A. Gainor, Ph.D.

The Reverend Doctor Kathy A. Gainor is department chair and an associate professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Leadership at Montclair State University in Montclair, New Jersey. Additionally, Dr. Gainor is a Minister of Spiritual Consciousness ordained by the Inner Visions Institute for Spiritual Development under the tutelage of the Rev. Dr. Iyanla Vanzant.

Dr. Gainor holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Michigan State University, an M.A. in counseling psychology from Boston College and a B.A. in psychology from Waynesburg College (PA). She is a licensed psychologist in New Jersey with more than 30 years of experience providing psychotherapy, counseling, coaching, and advising services, primarily to adults in university settings. Her research interests have focused on spirituality and religion in counseling practice as an aspect of multicultural counseling and development, vocational and career development, and counselor andragogy and training.

As a counselor educator, Dr. Gainor has taught courses in multicultural counseling and development, counseling theories, counseling skills, group work, career counseling, professional orientation and ethics, and community resources, and provides supervision to practicum and internship students. She has developed and teaches a graduate-level course, Spirituality in Counseling Practice, in which students explore their own spiritual journey as they develop spiritual counseling competence.

Q & A

Developing Resiliency Skills in Clients

Increasing resiliency skills is valuable for every client and provider. The ability to “bounce back” from challenges allows for personal growth and change to occur. Everyone has challenges and strengths; the key is to identify both. The holidays often pose certain risks to clients and counselors due to increased time with family, pressure to meet expectations, and economic tensions.

Participants in this workshop will learn how to:

  • Identify core resiliency skills.
  • “Mine” resiliency skills with specific questions.
  • Help clients identify their unique holiday stressors and use resiliency methods to lessen them.
Mary E. Jones

Mary E. Jones, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, LMFT

Mary E. Jones has over 30 years of experience in both counselor education and clinical practice. She has worked in private practice, public agency, hospital and college settings. Her areas of expertise are in resiliency, relationships, anxiety and depression, grief, and women’s health. She is licensed as both a professional counselor and a marriage and family therapist in the state of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones has bachelor’s degrees in public relations and human geography and a master’s degree in counseling and human resource development from South Dakota State University. She has a doctorate in counseling and psychology in education from the University of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones currently resides in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and is a consultant as well as an adjunct faculty member for Capella University in the Master’s in Mental Health Counseling program. Her interest and experience in resiliency has led her to present at both national and international venues.

Q & A

Considerations for Assessment, Diagnosis and Counseling of Teenagers with Addiction Issues

This webinar will focus on assessment of individuals presenting for counseling and determining if a substance use disorder is present using DSM-5 criteria and other considerations. Diagnostic considerations discussed will include developmental issues and concerns, cultural elements, and other relevant issues. Participants will discuss pros and cons of diagnosis, including stigma and client motivation.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders.
  • Learn about other signs and symptoms of problematic substance use.
  • Consider assessment and diagnostic implications for counseling.
Kevin Doyle

Kevin Doyle, Ed.D., LPC, LSATP

Dr. Kevin Doyle is a professor and co-coordinator of the Counselor Education program at Longwood University, in Farmville, Virginia, where he has taught for the past four years. Prior to that, he taught for 14 years as an adjunct professor at the University of Virginia. He holds an Ed.D. in counselor education from the University of Virginia, an Ed.S. in counseling psychology from James Madison University, and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary.

Before entering academia full-time, he worked in various addiction treatment programs for the previous 26 years, including residential, outpatient, and inpatient settings. Licensed as professional counselor and as a substance abuse treatment practitioner in Virginia, he has served three terms on the Commonwealth of Virginia Board of Counseling, including two terms as board chair. His professional and research interests include counseling ethics, college students in recovery and counseling athletes.

Dr. Doyle has published numerous articles in professional publications and presents frequently at the state and national levels and serves on the editorial boards of two professional journals. He maintains a small private practice in Charlottesville, specializing in working with men, college students, and health care professionals with substance use disorders.

He resides in Charlottesville with his wife, with whom he has three children.

Q & A

Cultural Applications of Neurocounseling for Clinicians

This webinar aims at familiarizing clinicians with some advances in cultural neuroscience and deep culture concepts that impact counselors’ work, and the client/counselor relationship.

This session will help participants:

  • Become familiar with cultural neuroscience concepts useful in counselors’ work.
  • Gain understanding of the concept of deep culture and its impact on brain development.
  • Attain an appreciation of how the counselor/client connection is strengthened by greater (conscious) cultural understanding.
  • Learn some physiological “universals” that clinicians can use to help clients manage arousal.
Sandra I. Lopez-Baez

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez is a core faculty member in the Counselor Education program at Walden University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher, and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education; program development; research activities; cross-cultural consultation; and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after growth experiences, and the neurobiology of connection as it relates to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia.

Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals and has delivered presentations at regional, national and international conferences.

Q & A

Identifying Issues and Finding Solutions: Navigating Clinical Supervision

There are many variables for clinical supervisors to consider when intervening with a supervisee. This webinar will offer a structure to help supervisors assess issues correctly and to choose corresponding interventions. Examples will be provided that underscore possible challenges to effective supervision.

The objectives of this session are to:

  • Provide beginning and experienced supervisors with a conceptual map for considering different aspects of supervision.
  • Explain how different aspects of supervision are intertwined.
  • Prepare supervisors to better assess the situation in supervision and choose appropriate interventions.
Janine M. Bernard

Janine M. Bernard, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LMHC

Janine M. Bernard is professor emeritus of counseling and counselor education at Syracuse University, in New York. Prior to her appointment at Syracuse University, she held positions at Purdue University and Fairfield University. Dr. Bernard received her undergraduate degree in English literature from Stonehill College, a master’s in counseling from the University of Connecticut, and her doctoral degree in counseling and counselor education from Purdue University, where she later received the Award of Distinction as an alumna. She is a National Certified Counselor, an Approved Clinical Supervisor, and is licensed in New York as a mental health counselor. Dr. Bernard served on NBCC’s Board of Directors from 1993–1999. She is a Fellow of the American Counseling Association (ACA), has been awarded the Alfred A. Hitchcock Distinguished Professional Service Award from ACA, and was recently chosen as a Legacy Award recipient by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

Dr. Bernard is the author of the widely used Discrimination Model of supervision and has published numerous articles and book chapters in the area of clinical supervision. Her co-authored text (with Rodney Goodyear), Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision, is now in its 5th edition. Dr. Bernard has made presentations on a variety of topics in supervision throughout the U.S. and Canada, and in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

Q & A

Understanding Military Families: Principles, Culture and Interventions in the Counseling Process

The purpose of this webinar is to familiarize counselors with military families and the cultural complexities of particular minority groups within the military culture. The webinar will emphasize the different counseling needs of enlisted personnel and commissioned personnel.

This session will:

  • Familiarize civilian counselors with the complexities of military culture.
  • Help counselors to understand the multicultural competencies interventions most appropriate for military families.
  • Differentiate among cultural differences throughout the military.
Edil Torres Rivera

Edil Torres Rivera, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

Edil Torres Rivera has a Ph.D. in counseling psychology with a concentration in multicultural counseling from the University of Connecticut, in Storrs. He is a professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus. Dr. Torres Rivera is native Puerto Rican with a career of over 20 years in counseling. This includes 12 years in the United States Army as a behavioral science specialist, where his work included substance abuse counseling and military families counseling during deployment.

Dr. Torres Rivera’s research interests are in multicultural counseling, group work, chaos theory, liberation psychology, indigenous counseling, Puerto Rican studies, identity development, and gang/prison-related behavior. Specifically, his primary research focuses on complexity and how indigenous healing techniques are a necessary component when working with ethnic minority populations in the United States. Dr. Torres has additional interests in studying the implications of social injustice and oppression in counseling and psychotherapy with ethnic minorities in the United States.

His community work includes consultation services to the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Council in Nevada, visiting professor to the Universidad del Valle, Guatemala, and director of the Graduate School of Education’s school counseling program in Singapore.

Q & A

Preventing Child and Adolescent Suicide: Myths, Risks and Protective Factors

This webinar will provide beginning and experienced counselors with the preliminary background information they need to begin assessing whether a child or adolescent client is either suicidal or potentially suicidal, so that suicide assessments and subsequent treatment plans can be as accurate as possible.

The objectives of this session are:

  • To present and discuss myths connected with child and adolescent suicide so that misinformation is not used in assessing whether a client is potentially suicidal.
  • To discuss risk factors that increase the risk of suicidal intentionality and to discuss the protective factors that reduce the risk of suicide attempts and completions.
  • Become familiar with several community-based recovery support groups.
  • To provide mental health counselors and other professionals with the information they need to recognize the suicidal profile so they might more easily identify potentially suicidal clients and develop treatment plans.
David Capuzzi

David Capuzzi, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

David Capuzzi is a graduate of Florida State University and licensed as a counselor in Oregon. He is certified by the National Board for Certified Counselors as a National Certified Counselor. Currently, Dr. Capuzzi is a core faculty member in the clinical mental health counseling degree program in counselor education and supervision at Walden University as well as a senior faculty associate in the Department of Counseling and Human Services at Johns Hopkins University. He is professor emeritus at Portland State University, in Portland, Oregon. From 2007–2009, he served as affiliate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is past president of the American Counseling Association (ACA).

A frequent keynote and workshop presenter at professional conferences and institutes, Dr. Capuzzi has also consulted with a variety of school districts and community agencies on initiating prevention and intervention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. He has facilitated the development of suicide prevention, crisis management and postvention programs in communities throughout the United States; provides training on the topics of youth at risk, grief and loss, group work and other topics; and serves as an invited adjunct faculty member at other universities as time permits. He is the first recipient of ACA's Kitty Cole Human Rights Award and a recipient of the Leona Tyler Award in Oregon. He was inducted as an ACA fellow in 2008, and was the 2010 recipient of ACA’s Kathleen and Gilbert Wrenn Award for a Humanitarian and Caring Person. In 2011, he was named a Distinguished Alumnus by the College of Education at Florida State University.

Dr. Capuzzi has co-authored or co-edited 10 textbooks used in counselor education programs.

Q & A

Working with Clients With Substance Use Disorders: A Counselor’s Perspective

In this webinar, participants will be presented with an overview of substance use disorders by an experienced clinician and counselor educator. Topics to be covered include diagnosis using DSM-5 criteria, a review of how and where treatment is provided, pros and cons of common self-help recovery groups, and how to intervene with an individual exhibiting signs of a substance abuse problem.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders.
  • Learn about various treatment modalities and settings.
  • Become familiar with several community-based recovery support groups.
  • Explore how to intervene with a person exhibiting signs of a substance use problem.
Kevin Doyle

Kevin Doyle, Ed.D., LPC, LSATP

Dr. Kevin Doyle is a professor and co-coordinator of the Counselor Education program at Longwood University, in Farmville, Virginia, where he has taught for the past four years. Prior to that, he taught for 14 years as an adjunct professor at the University of Virginia. He holds an Ed.D. in counselor education from the University of Virginia, an Ed.S. in counseling psychology from James Madison University, and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary.

Before entering academia full-time, he worked in various addiction treatment programs for the previous 26 years, including residential, outpatient, and inpatient settings. Licensed as professional counselor and as a substance abuse treatment practitioner in Virginia, he has served three terms on the Commonwealth of Virginia Board of Counseling, including two terms as board chair. His professional and research interests include counseling ethics, college students in recovery and counseling athletes.

Dr. Doyle has published numerous articles in professional publications and presents frequently at the state and national levels and serves on the editorial boards of two professional journals. He maintains a small private practice in Charlottesville, specializing in working with men, college students, and health care professionals with substance use disorders.

He resides in Charlottesville with his wife, with whom he has three children.

Q & A

An Introduction to Publishing in Peer-Reviewed Journals

Publishing can be a daunting process, yet peer-reviewed published research improves the effectiveness of counseling and counselor education. Without knowing where to begin, new counselor educators, graduate students and clinicians often stumble through the process, or choose not to publish significant works. Taking the fear and confusion out of the publication process, this webinar will provide an explanation of the publication process, tips for successful submission, and specifics on how to create manuscripts from theses and dissertations.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to choose the appropriate publication for their work.
  • Learn more about the publication process, including timelines and appropriate communication.
  • Learn how to best communicate with journal editors and editorial board members.
  • Learn how to create manuscripts from current work products.
Edina Renfro-Michel

Edina Renfro-Michel, Ph.D., ACS, LPC

Edina Renfro-Michel is an associate professor of counseling in the department of counseling and educational leadership at Montclair State University, in New Jersey. She obtained her Ph.D. in counselor education at Mississippi State University and both her B.A. in elementary education with a specialty in early childhood education and her M.A. in human services counseling at the University of New Orleans. Dr. Renfro-Michel is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey and an Approved Clinical Supervisor. She is the current secretary for the North Atlantic Region of the Association of Counselor Education and Supervision (NARACES).

Dr. Choudhuri is a licensed professional counselor in Connecticut and Michigan with over 15 years of experience working with clients individually, as well as in couples, families and groups. She is a National Certified Counselor and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor credential. She is also a consultant and frequent presenter on cultural competence, diversity and ethical issues. Clinically, she specializes in cross-cultural and diversity issues, as well as trauma, assault and abuse. Her clinical experience has been in agency and university settings, working with refugee populations, sexual assault and abuse survivors, and immigrant and multicultural populations.

Dr. Renfro-Michel has presented and published on her research interests in attachment theory, technology, supervision and counselor education pedagogy. She is the co-editor of the recently published book Using Technology to Enhance Clinical Supervision.

Culturally Competent Trauma-Informed Care

This webinar will examine the ways in which cultural competence is essential for working effectively with trauma. Awareness, knowledge and sensitivity to the cultural contexts in which trauma occurs, ways in which the experience of trauma can be culturally constructed, and the role of historical and intergenerational trauma will be covered. The use of a case study ensures the presentation is grounded in clinical strategies and skills that participants can use.

After this session, participants will:

  • Understand the ways in which cultural identities and worldview intersect with trauma and the role of multiple identities.
  • Understand how cultural competence in trauma work is enhanced by increased awareness of both the client and clinician's cultural identities.
  • Be able to apply culturally competent strategies to trauma assessment; making meaning; and addressing issues of shame, guilt and anger
  • Understand and be able to use trauma reenactment through grounding and resourcing.
Devika Dibya Choudhuri

Devika Dibya Choudhuri, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Devika Dibya Choudhuri is professor of clinical mental health counseling at the University of Saint Joseph, in Connecticut. She previously held a position as a professor in Eastern Michigan University’s graduate program in counseling. Originally from India, she completed her undergraduate work at Smith College, her M.S. in counseling at the University of Vermont, and her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision at Syracuse University. She is past Chair of the National Board for Certified Counselors Board of Directors. She has been a member of the American Counseling Association, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, and Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development for almost 20 years.

Dr. Choudhuri is a licensed professional counselor in Connecticut and Michigan with over 15 years of experience working with clients individually, as well as in couples, families and groups. She is a National Certified Counselor and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor credential. She is also a consultant and frequent presenter on cultural competence, diversity and ethical issues. Clinically, she specializes in cross-cultural and diversity issues, as well as trauma, assault and abuse. Her clinical experience has been in agency and university settings, working with refugee populations, sexual assault and abuse survivors, and immigrant and multicultural populations.

As a counselor educator, she teaches courses such as cross-cultural counseling, advanced multicultural counseling, counseling skills, group work, couple and family counseling, and counseling women and LGBT populations.

Dr. Choudhuri’s research and publications have focused on the areas of multicultural client issues, counselor supervision and pedagogy. She has published a textbook on multicultural counseling and edited a set of eight monographs to go along with the textbook. She has written many journal articles and book chapters on these topics, and has given numerous presentations nationally and internationally.

Q & A

Neurobiology for Professional Counselors

Dr. Allen Ivey will present basics of neurobiology as they apply to the practice of counseling, with special attention to social justice, as well as the dangers and implications of stress on the brain and body. He will discuss the Mankato Nun Study and the importance of a healthy lifestyle for living longer and preventing Alzheimer’s. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) focuses on 20 specific actions for wellness.

During this session, participants will learn:

  • Some key basics of neurobiology as they relate to counseling practice.
  • How neurobiology informs social justice and calls us to action.
  • How stress impacts the brain and body and the reasons to make stress management more central in practice.
  • The implications of the Mankato Nun Study for daily practice and living.
  • How to incorporate Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) in daily counseling and clinical practice.
Allen Ivey

Allen E. Ivey, Ed.D.

Allen E. Ivey is distinguished university professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and professor of counseling at the University of South Florida, in Tampa. His undergraduate university was Stanford, followed by a Fulbright year studying social work and social justice issues in Denmark. He holds a doctorate from Harvard. Dr. Ivey founded and directed the counseling centers at both Bucknell University and Colorado State University. He is the author or coauthor of more than 200 articles and 40 books translated into 25 languages, and has produced many video demonstrations. He and his wife, Mary, have presented workshops and keynote addresses throughout the nation and internationally.

Dr. Ivey is known for his work in college student development, the microcounseling framework, developmental counseling and therapy theory and practice, and his early work in neuroscience and its application in counseling. Multicultural issues have always been a central focus for Dr. Ivey, and he held his first workshop on racism in 1967 in Los Angeles. He was active in a group that worked for 20 years to ensure that the multicultural competencies and guidelines were adopted by both the American Counseling Association and American Psychological Association.

Q & A

Counseling Transgender Clients

Transgender and transsexual clients deserve competent, culturally and contextually relevant care to help cope with institutionalized marginalization, stigmatization and oppression. This webinar will offer practical strategies for supporting mental health and wellness, from a holistic qualitative assessment process to continued psychotherapeutic care. Attention will be paid to recommendations and standards set forth by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, with special focus on the specific counseling needs and integrative care to support wellness for transgender and transsexual persons.

During this session, participants will learn about:

  • Qualitative, whole-person assessments of transgender and transsexual clients.
  • Culturally and contextually relevant care for transgender and transsexual clients.
  • Issues of transition.
  • Wraparound care and support for transgender clients.
Jason Patton

Jason Patton, Ph.D., LPC

Jason Patton received his Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision at St. Mary's University, in San Antonio, Texas. He received his M.A. in professional counseling from Texas State University, in San Marcos. He is a licensed professional counselor in Georgia. Dr. Patton engages relational cultural theory and critical pedagogy in practice and teaching. His clinical work and research interests center on clients of gender and sexual diversity, transgender body migration, trauma and the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, abuse, relational concerns, depression, anxiety, and other issues.

Dr. Patton has held leadership roles for a number of professional organizations and a position on the editorial board of the Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality. He has presented at a number of national conferences, including those of the American Counseling Association, the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling, and the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision. He has published in several professional journals and authored chapters in a number of textbooks. Dr. Patton is a core faculty member and the field experience coordinator of Walden University’s Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision program, as well as a member of the institutional review board. His passion for field experience extends from a commitment to ensuring the best care for clients, as well as advancing his students’ professional orientations—mentoring them to excel in their careers.

Q & A

Counseling Military Service Members and Their Families

The recent military engagements in Afghanistan and Iraq and subsequent drawdown in forces have created unique circumstances for military service members and their families. Repeated and unpredictable deployments present a unique constellation of concerns within the military family.

Mental health and physical concerns such as post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury can significantly impact the well-being of our military population. Awareness of the experience of military service members and their families and the issues they encounter is imperative for the provision of quality services. This webinar will provide information related to the unique experience of military service members and their families.

Participants will receive information on the prevalent concerns and associated counseling interventions that can address the mental health needs of this population. Participants will also be directed to appropriate resources to gain further knowledge of effective strategies to support military service members and their families.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the unique experience of military service members and their families.
  • Receive information about common concerns of this population as they relate to counseling.
  • Gain exposure to counseling interventions that can support military service members and their families.
Seth Hayden

Seth C.W. Hayden, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Seth C.W. Hayden is assistant professor of counseling at Wake Forest University. Dr. Hayden has provided career and personal counseling in community agencies, secondary school and university settings. Dr. Hayden’s research and clinical work focus on the career and personal development of military service members, veterans and their families. In addition, he explores the connection between career and mental health issues as well as integrated models of clinical supervision designed to facilitate positive growth in counselors’ ability to formulate interventions. Dr. Hayden is past-president of the Military and Government Counseling Association and chair of the research committee for the National Career Development Association, both divisions of the American Counseling Association.

Dr. Hayden received his Bachelor of Arts in psychology, Bachelor of Science in education, and Master of Science in counseling from the University of Memphis. He completed his doctoral work in counselor education and supervision at the University of Virginia. Dr. Hayden is a licensed professional counselor in Virginia and is credentialed as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) through NBCC. He also holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) from the Center for Credentialing & Education.

Q & A

Counseling Same-Sex Couples

This webinar will present participants with interventions to use with same-sex/same-gender couples. It will be presented from an empowerment model, not a deficit model. Participants will be educated about terminology relevant to same-sex/same-gender couples. The presenter will discuss the importance of building a strong empathic bond with the couple, being careful not to belittle the relationship, as well as ways to facilitate communication in the relationship. The presenter will also discuss the impact of the legalization of same-sex marriage, premarital counseling, and statistical data regarding same-sex/same-gender marriage. The presentation will cover adoption, sexual roles and infectious diseases.

During this session, participants will learn about:

  • How various characteristics (length of relationship, age of the people involved, family dynamics, sexual roles, etc.) impact same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The importance of empathy, understanding and encouragement in the counselor/client relationship when working with same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The impact of marriage and children on same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The impact of infectious diseases on same-sex/same-gender couples.
David Julius Ford

David Julius Ford Jr., Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

David Julius Ford Jr. has a B.A. in psychology and an M.A. in clinical mental health counseling, both from Wake Forest University. In May 2014, he earned his Ph.D. in education with a concentration in counselor education and supervision at Old Dominion University. Dr. Ford is a licensed professional counselor in North Carolina and is also seeking licensure in Virginia. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Ford recently completed his first year as an assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Graduate Psychology at James Madison University, where he serves as the faculty adviser to the Nu Lambda chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and the Contemporary Gospel Singers of JMU.

Dr. Ford’s professional interests are Greek life; multicultural issues; college students; African-American males in higher education; addictions counseling; supervision; group work; qualitative research; the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual (LGBTQQIA) community; and persons living with HIV/AIDS. He has experience as an instructor for undergraduate human services courses and has taught graduate course on career counseling, testing and assessment, clinical mental health counseling, and group counseling. He has also taught a doctoral-level dissertation course. He is one of 24 inaugural fellows of the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Ford is a classically trained pianist and is a proud and active member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. As an undergraduate, he had the privilege of taking a class taught by the late Dr. Maya Angelou. Dr. Ford currently lives in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 3: Peshawar Trauma Project (A Case Study)

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 3 of this three-part webinar will discuss a case study. The Peshawar trauma project was implemented singlehandedly in the aftermath of the December 16, 2014, Taliban attack on a school in Peshawar, Pakistan. The attack resulted in the brutal execution of 152 people, 132 of whom were children ages 7–17. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how crowdfunding and personal fundraising efforts were utilized to finance the project.
  • Learn more about the implementation of the project from start to finish.
  • Learn about the in-vivo method of service delivery and training delivery that allowed for maximum use of limited time and resources.
  • Learn about therapeutic methods used and therapeutic outcomes during the project.
  • Learn about the future direction of this and other projects.
Shahnaz Khawaja

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 2: Building Emotional Resilience

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 2 of this three-part webinar will focus on building emotional resilience. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to help clients identify inner strengths.
  • Learn how to employ culturally specific belief systems to enhance emotional strength and resiliency.
  • Learn how to utilize an eclectic mix of therapeutic interventions to generate new neural pathways and build neural plasticity, leading to increased emotional resilience.
Shahnaz Khawaja

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 1: Brief Interventions

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 1 of this three-part webinar will focus on brief interventions in trauma counseling. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the stress response and its different stages.
  • Learn how to assess a client for stress response.
  • Learn about basic scaling during therapeutic intervention.
  • Learn how to effectively deactivate stress response.
  • Learn to identify when a client is past the stress response state and in a learning state.
  • Learn several brief interventions effective in trauma counseling.
Shahnaz Khawaja

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Discussion

Group and Cultural Dynamics of Suicide

How can a counselor identify the different group or cultural dynamics that can influence a client at risk for suicide? This webinar will demonstrate how to determine suicidal lethality and possible risk to others within these group dynamics. Participants will also become more aware of professional bias and its effect on their ability to provide a suicide intervention. The goal of the webinar is to increase overall awareness of group and cultural influence and its relationship to success in treatment, prevention and intervention of a suicidal client.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to identify different groups and their influence on a client at risk for suicide.
  • Assess key significant characteristics of specific group dynamics and their influence on suicidal lethality and possible eminent danger to the client or others.
  • Increase personal awareness of professional group bias and how it can affect the ability to help a client at risk for suicide.
Eleanor Hamm

Eleanor Hamm, M.A., NCC, LPC

Eleanor Hamm worked for 40 years as the executive director of the Pueblo Suicide Prevention Center, in Colorado, during which time she lectured and trained professionals on suicide prevention and crisis intervention on a state, national and international level. She was a national accreditation examiner for the American Association of Suicidology for 30 years and one of the founding developers of the Colorado State Suicide Coalition. Ms. Hamm is a licensed professional counselor and National Certified Counselor. She holds a master’s in counseling from Adams State University in Alamosa, Colorado.

Discussion

Multicultural Counseling Competencies

The intent of this one-hour webinar is to reintroduce the social justice aspects of the Multicultural Counseling Competencies of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD). Section E.5.b of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics states that counselors have an ethical obligation to provide multiculturally competent services. Counselors are also ethically bound to advocate with and on behalf of clients at the individual, group, institutional and societal levels should such situations arise, as stated in Section A.7.a. Therefore, multiculturally competent counseling must be inclusive of social justice. It must provide equal access and opportunity, be inclusive, and remove individual and systemic barriers to fair mental health services.

During this session, participants will:

  • Clearly connect social justice with multicultural competence.
  • Discuss critical thinking skills and how these skills are necessary to analyze inequities.
  • Develop ways to incorporate social justice interventions into one’s practice.
Michael Brooks

Michael Brooks, Ph.D., NCC

Michael Brooks is associate professor of counselor education at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro. Dr. Brooks earned a master’s and doctoral degree in counselor education from the University of Central Florida in Orlando. He has presented in the areas of multiculturalism and multicultural competency, ethics relating to diversity, school counselor effectiveness, professional development school models, and mentoring at several regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Brooks has also served on nationally televised panels to discuss HIV and substance abuse.Dr. Brooks has an extensive publication record in several counseling flagship journals, as well as publications in multicultural education and student affairs journals. He has one edited textbook, on black male success, and several authored book chapters. Prior to a beginning a career in higher education, Dr. Brooks worked as a county government mental health counselor. He has been the president of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and the Alabama Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

Discussion

Preparing Counselors of Color: Addressing Differences in Counselor Education and Supervision Practice

People of color make up a small percentage of both those receiving mental health and addiction services and of mental health practitioners (e.g., counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers). Due to the disparity among mental health practitioners of color and the patient population, education, training and supervision in cultural competence are imperative. As counselor educators who mainly educate and supervise counselors of color (COCs) and counseling students of color (CSOCs), the presenters have found that they have unique areas of cultural competence that need to be addressed. Several CSOCs report ill feelings, anger and even depression as it relates to experiences in which they have been discriminated against, oppressed and treated unfairly because of their race. Some report negative interracial relationships, experiences and media messages, which may result in mistrust, dislike, envy and even hatred of whites and other people of color. Some mental health professionals also face challenges in educating and supervising COCs and CSOCs due to their own level of cultural competence and lack of training in addressing these issues.

This webinar will provide knowledge, strategies and techniques that will assist counselors, supervisors and counselor educators who work with CSOCs as well as address potential barriers. Furthermore, this webinar will briefly outline the results of a review of multicultural textbooks used in counseling programs and their inclusion of content specifically targeted at developing the unique areas of cultural competence for CSOCs.

In this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the unique areas of cultural competence that counselors of color (COCs) and counseling students of color (CSOCs) face.
  • Become familiar with strategies and techniques that will be helpful in assisting COCs and CSOCs to navigate the challenges they might have in working with whites and/or other people of color.
  • Learn about ways to address the barriers that COCs face when training and supervising.
  • Be introduced to the research findings of the review of multicultural textbooks that may be helpful in preparing COCs and CSOCs with their development as culturally competent practitioners.
Kyla Marie Kurian

Kyla Marie Kurian, Ph.D., NCC

Kyla Marie Kurian is an assistant professor at North Carolina Central University, where she teaches in the counselor education program in the Department of Allied Health Professions. Dr. Kurian earned her doctorate in counseling from North Carolina State University. Following graduation, Dr. Kurian spent three years as a National Institute on Drug Abuse postdoctoral fellow, where she received advanced training in the research areas of substance abuse and HIV interventions. Dr. Kurian’s research focuses on understanding the effects of oppression on the identity development of black and Coloured South African women and addressing the differences in preparing counselors of color in counselor education and supervision practice.

Dr. Kurian was awarded a Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) grant from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to adapt an evidence-based HIV intervention for African-American college women. Most recently, Dr. Kurian headed a team of researchers who were awarded a 2014 Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) research grant.

Q & ADiscussion

Understanding Diversity in Teaching and Program Evaluation

According to a 2014 special report by USA Today, analysis of census data reveals a one-in-two chance that the next individual you encounter in a public setting such as work or a store will be from a race or ethnic group different from your own. As counselors, we need to understand diversity in teaching in terms of the responsibilities identified in the 2012 NBCC Code of Ethics, the 2014 American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP) 2009 Standards.

During this session, participants will:

  • Discuss the importance of diversity in teaching and program evaluation.
  • Examine diversity in teaching and program evaluation as it relates to the 2012 NBCC Code of Ethics, the 2014 ACA Code of Ethics and the 2009 CACREP Standards.
  • Identify, compare and evaluate the appropriateness of multicultural training experiences.
  • Identify useful strategies for experiencing challenging student responses to multicultural sensitivity and awareness.
  • Apply information related to diversity in teaching and program evaluation through the use of scenarios.
  • Examine future directions for diversity in teaching and program evaluation.
Gloria Dansby

Gloria Dansby-Giles, Ed.D., NCC, NCSC, NCCC, ACS, LPC

Gloria Dansby-Giles is professor of counselor education at Jackson State University, in Mississippi. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC), a National Certified Career Counselor (NCCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Dansby-Giles has served on the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program Advisory Council and as southern regional vice president and ethics chair for the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). She has also served on the Mississippi Board of Examiners for Licensed Professional Counselors.

Dr. Dansby-Giles has received numerous awards for teaching, including the Faculty Excellence Award, the Innovators Award and three College of Education teaching awards. Other notable recognition includes the Higher Education Appreciation Day, Working for Academic Excellence from the Mississippi state legislature and the Teaching Effectiveness Award.

Phillip Clarke

Phillip Clarke, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Dr. Clarke is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Wake Forest University, where he teaches courses on addictions and advanced counseling skills. Dr. Clarke is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in the state of North Carolina. His research and writing interests include wellness and development, substance abuse, supervision and teaching, and individuals diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers. He currently provides individual and group counseling for clients living with dementia and their caregivers at Wake Forest Baptist Health.

Q & ADiscussion

Promoting the Intersectionality of Multicultural and LGBTQ Competency

A key component to forming our professional ethical identity is maintaining appropriate multicultural competency as professional counselors. Within the profession of counseling, there currently exist important competency documents that guide counseling practices with multicultural populations, spirituality issues, and LGBTQ individuals. This webinar will help participants to learn the framework for defining counseling competency and recognize the importance of viewing cultural competency as the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, ability, gender/gender identity, and sexual orientation. Participants will identify strategies to integrate the various competency models in order to promote best practices with LGBTQ clients and students.

During this session, participants will:

  • Examine the intersectionality of the multicultural and the LGBTQ competencies when counseling LGBTQ individuals from diverse backgrounds.
  • Explore the training needs for counselors working with the LGBTQ population.
  • Identify strategies for addressing potential value conflicts and ethical issues that may exist in counseling LGBTQ individuals.
  • Discuss strategies for increasing professional competency when working with this population.
Michael Kocet

Michael M. Kocet, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Kocet is associate professor and student affairs program director of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. Dr. Kocet earned his Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Arkansas and completed a graduate certificate in dispute resolution at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a licensed mental health counselor and a National Certified Counselor (NCC). His professional areas of interest include ethical issues in counseling; counseling gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender clients; and grief counseling. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on ethics and diversity issues. Dr. Kocet served as a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethics Committee (2001-2007) and as chair of the ACA Ethics Code Revision Taskforce (2002-2005). He is past president of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs, and is sought as a national speaker and consultant on ethical issues in counseling.

Q & ADiscussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 3)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

This third webinar focuses on disorders common in the practice of mental health counselors, including some disorders new to the DSM-5. Several disorders will be covered in more depth, including autism spectrum; schizophrenia spectrum; and bipolar, depressive, anxiety, trauma-based, and substance use and addictive disorders. The presentation will also include an enhanced focus on the use of cross-cutting symptom and severity measures and a review of best practices in diagnosing and preparing for treatment.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the salient diagnostic criteria of common DSM-5 mental disorders.
  • Describe how to use cross-cutting symptom and severity measures to strengthen assessment and clinical utility.
  • Identify at least two best-practice strategies in diagnosing and preparing for treatment-planning.
Matt Buckley

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Discussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 2)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

Part two will focus on specific assessment instruments related to the DSM-5 and how to creatively and effectively use them in practice. Unprecedented in the history of the DSM is the series of assessment instruments available to mental health clinicians on the companion Web site, www.psychiatry.org/dsm5. The discussion will feature specific assessment instruments, their utility and limitations, and suggestions for use, including sensitivity in their application. The presentation will also highlight specific instruments, including the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI), and some cross-cutting symptom severity measures, and provide examples of how some of these instruments are being used in clinical practice.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the uses of level 1 and level 2 cross-cutting measures, the WHODAS, and the Cultural Formulation Interview.
  • Identify two best practices in using the DSM-5 assessment measures.
  • Identify how they can utilize these assessment instruments to better inform diagnosis and treatment-planning.
Matt Buckley

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Q & ADiscussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 1)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

Part 1 will focus on basic changes to the DSM-5 and its clinical utility, including the shift from categorical to dimensional assessment, use of cross-cutting symptom and severity measures, elimination of the multiaxial format and development of a nonaxial diagnosis, and adoption of a spectrum perspective. The material will be presented from the perspective of professional counseling and how counselors can maintain a lifespan development and wellness perspective while working within this mental health nosology inherently embedded in the medical model. This presentation will serve as a foundation for future webinars on the assessment and diagnosis of specific mental disorders, treatment implications, and therapeutic factors in counseling interventions.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the major differences between categorical and dimensional approaches to diagnosis.
  • Describe how the DSM-5 provides clinical utility in regard to the process of assessing and diagnosing clients.
  • Identify two best-practice strategies for maintaining a counselor’s perspective while using the DSM-5.
Matt Buckley

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Q & ADiscussion

Preparing a Research Manuscript for Publication

This webinar focuses on the process of turning a research paper or conceptual paper into a manuscript suitable for publication. Participants will learn about key manuscript components, types of manuscripts, cover letters and finding a suitable venue for submission.

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the components of a manuscript suitable for publication.
  • Locate an appropriate publication for submission of their manuscript.
  • Understand the process of submission and review of their manuscript.
Sandra Lopez-Baez

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, CCMHC, LPC-Chair

Dr. Lopez-Baez is a professor in the counseling and educational leadership programs at Montclair State University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education, program development, research activities, consultation (cross-cultural), and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after "growth" experiences, and the neurobiology of connection related to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals, and has delivered multiple presentations at regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia. She is a member of ACA, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Honor Society.

Discussion

Finding Your Voice as a Social Justice Advocate

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Learn what social justice advocacy is and the aspects it encompasses.
  • Identify how their everyday work empowers nondominant groups.
  • Identify professional and personal strengths that transfer to advocacy work.
  • Learn strategies to become a stronger advocate.
  • Learn how to create an advocacy action plan.
Jennifer Cook

Presented by: Jennifer M. Cook Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Jennifer M. Cook is assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology at Marquette University, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is a passionate multicultural counselor, educator, supervisor and researcher who infuses advocacy throughout her work. Dr. Cook has served clients, particularly underserved populations, in private practice and clinical mental health settings, and supervised school and clinical mental health counselors-in-training. Her research interests focus on counselor multicultural development, with particular emphasis on issues related to social class and socioeconomic status. Dr. Cook earned her Ph.D. in counselor education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and was proud to be selected for the 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program.

Q & ADiscussion

Managing Clients at Risk for Suicide or Violence: Legal and Ethical Issues

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand that it is important to use the term “may be risk” rather than “at risk;”
  • Appreciate the importance of following guidelines for dealing with potentially at-risk clients that have been established by their place of employment;
  • Articulate the reasons why involving immediate supervisors when clients may be at risk for suicide or violence is so important;
  • List options that are available to counselors when a determination is made that the client is not at risk for suicide;
  • Discuss procedures to follow when a client who may be risk for suicide or violence returns to the counselor for additional services.
Theodore Remley

Presented by: Theodore P. Remley Jr.Ph.D., J.D., NCC, LPC, LMFT

Theodore P. Remley Jr. is a professor of counseling at Our Lady of Holy Cross College in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Remley holds a Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Florida and a law degree from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a member of Chi Sigma Iota. He is licensed as a professional counselor in Virginia, Louisiana and Mississippi, and is licensed to practice law in Virginia and Florida. He is licensed as a marriage and family therapist in Louisiana. Dr. Remley is the author and co-author of a number of articles, books and book chapters related to legal and ethical issues in counseling. For more than a decade, he has directed very popular counselor institutes in Italy and Ireland, and in cooperation with NBCC International, in Bhutan; Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Malawi, Africa. In the past, Dr. Remley has held full-time counseling faculty positions at George Mason University, Mississippi State University, the University of New Orleans and Old Dominion University. Dr. Remley is a former executive director of the American Counseling Association.

Q & ADiscussion

Counseling African-American Male Substance Users

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify barriers to African-American male substance users' participation in counseling therapy and research.
  • Describe active coping and discuss its impact on African-American male behavior and assessments.
  • Identify strategies for addressing African-American males' active coping styles in a counseling setting.
  • Describe the influence of spirituality on African-American male substance users' core belief system behavior patterns.
  • List four factors related to substance use among African-American male substance users.
  • List four methods for engaging and retaining African-American male substance users in counseling and research.
Robert A. Horne

Presented by: Robert A. Horne Ph.D, NCC, LPC, LCAS, CSI

Robert A. Horne holds a Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, a master's degree in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and a Master of Divinity from Duke University's Duke Divinity School. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and holds licenses in North Carolina as a licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical addiction specialist and clinical supervisor intern. Dr. Horne is a 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow and currently serves as a therapist in private practice. His research focuses on substance use, identity and spirituality among males of African descent. Dr. Horne has experience working with diverse populations and provides mental health and substance use training in multiple countries, including South Africa, Guyana and Jamaica.

Discussion

Grant-Writing 101

Writing a successful grant proposal is often essential to secure funding for research or direct service to benefit underserved minority populations. Join Sherry Allen, NBCC Foundation executive director, for this webinar and learn:

  • How to find funding opportunities.
  • Describe active coping and discuss its impact on African-American male behavior and assessments.
  • How to determine if a funding opportunity is right for you.
  • About the essential steps to a successful grant application.
Sherry L. Allen

Presented by: Sherry L. Allen M.Ed., NCC, CCMHC, LPC, GPC

Sherry Allen is the executive director of the NBCC Foundation, Inc., leading the program development, fund development and board facilitation of the newest affiliate of the National Board for Certified Counselors. Prior to her current position, Ms. Allen was the president and CEO of Youth & Family Services Network (YFSN), where she facilitated and administered the delivery of training, technical assistance, fund development and advocacy support services to youth services agencies throughout the country. Through her agency work and private practice, she has provided trainings and consultation throughout the United States and Western Europe, with an emphasis on leadership, cultural competency, board development, grant development and nonprofit organizational development. Ms. Allen was an examination development content expert for the Grant Professionals Certification Institute, and has administered many federal grants of local, regional and national scope. She is a facilitator of processes and planning methods for both the Institute of Cultural Affairs and the National Coalition Building Institute. Ms. Allen is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in Tennessee and North Carolina, and has practiced as an individual, couples and family counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

Becoming a Culturally Competent Counselor: A Process

Presented by Atsuko Seto and Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, in this session, participants will:

  • Learn a brief history of the development of the multicultural counseling competencies and relevant research.
  • Approach the competencies from a process-oriented perspective.
  • Explore and reflect on their own cultural and unique individual backgrounds and the impact of these elements.
Atsuko Seto

Atsuko Seto Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

Atsuko Seto is an associate professor in the Department of Counselor Education at The College of New Jersey. She is the program coordinator of the educational specialist degree in marriage and family therapy program and the master’s in marriage, couple, and family counseling and therapy program, accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Dr. Seto is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). She holds a doctorate in counselor education from the University of Wyoming and a master's degree in counseling from Chadron State College, in Nebraska. Dr. Seto’s strong interest in multiculturalism and diversity in counseling began with her experience studying English as a second language (ESL) in the United States as an international student. Gaining insights into the potential impact of acculturative stressors, language barriers and race relations has fostered both her personal and professional growth while strengthening her commitment to lifelong learning.

At her clients’ request, Dr. Seto has provided counseling services to individuals and families in English and Japanese. Additionally, she has engaged in professional development at the global level. Dr. Seto assisted with the implementation of NBCC International’s Mental Health Facilitator (MHF) program in Japan, which was used to support survivors of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. She has also traveled to Rwanda to learn about the current state of the country and efforts to meet the population’s mental health needs. Dr. Seto’s scholarly activities include publications and presentations in the areas of counseling Asians and Asian Americans, intercultural couples, experiential multicultural counseling activities, and faculty professional development. Her recent publications include a coedited book titled Women’s Retreat: Voices of Female Faculty in Higher Education.

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez Ph.D., NCC, ACS, CCMHC, LPC-Chair

Dr. Lopez-Baez is a professor in the counseling and educational leadership programs at Montclair State University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education, program development, research activities, consultation (cross-cultural), and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after "growth" experiences, and the neurobiology of connection related to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals, and has delivered multiple presentations at regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia. She is a member of ACA, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Honor Society.

Q & ADiscussion

The Humanness of Minority Clients

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Comprehend basic philosophical influences on the counseling relationship.
  • Identify fundamental principles in humanistic counseling.
  • Understand how humanistic principles can be useful for working with minority clients.
  • Consider biases and assumptions they assign to clients as a result of preconceived ideas and beliefs about a certain minority group.
  • Discuss ways in which one can integrate humanistic principles into the counseling relationship.
Tyler Wilkinson

Presented by: Tyler Wilkinson Ph.D., NCC

Tyler Wilkinson holds a doctoral degree in counselor education and supervision from Auburn University, in Alabama. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), maintains a limited private practice and is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Wilkinson is interested in incorporating humanistic principles into counseling practice, counselor education and supervision. His other research interests include best practices for using technology in counseling and counselor education, couples counseling, and counseling student development.

Q & ADiscussion

Working With African-American Male Students in Schools

This session will help participants to:

  • Understand environmental pressures that can exist for African-American male students.
  • Examine interventions that can improve learning environments for African-American male students.
  • Examine individual and group counseling methods that are effective when working with African-American male students.
Mark Eades

Presented by: Mark Eades M.A., LPCA, NCC

Mark Eades is a current doctoral student in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and holds a master’s degree in school counseling from Wake Forest University. He is a licensed school counselor and licensed professional counselor associate (LPCA) in North Carolina and is a National Certified Counselor (NCC). Mr. Eades enjoys working with students of all ages and has counseled students from kindergarten through graduate school in a variety of settings. He has a special interest in talking with students about multicultural considerations, family concerns, teacher-student relationships and career-personality matching.

Q & ADiscussion

Arab-American Perspectives on Counseling

Presented by Tahani Dari and Shadin Atiyeh, this session will help participants to:

  • Understand the diversity and shared values of Arab-American populations.
  • Conduct studies effectively with Arab-American populations.
  • Implement successful community-based interventions.
  • Adapt traditional therapeutic approaches to work with Arab-American populations.
Tahani Dari

Tahani Dari M.A., LLPC, NCC

Tahani Dari holds a master's degree in school counseling from Eastern Michigan University. She is a National Certified Counselor and holds a limited counseling license from the state of Michigan. Ms. Dari is a proficient speaker of Arabic. She is currently serving as a school counselor and assessment coordinator for K–12 students and as a private practitioner working with a broad spectrum of issues, including career development, college advising, depression, anxiety, stress and trauma. Ms. Dari has experience in various community settings serving low-income families, immigrants and refugees, and working with women's issues.

Shadin Atiyeh

Shadin Atiyeh M.A., LLPC, NCC

Shadin Atiyeh holds a master's degree in community counseling from Eastern Michigan University. She is a National Certified Counselor and is a limited licensed counselor in the state of Michigan. Ms. Atiyeh speaks conversational Arabic, French and Spanish. She is currently working in private practice with a broad spectrum of issues, including trauma, depression, anxiety, stress, isolation and career development. She has experience working in various community agencies with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, immigrants and refugees, abused and neglected children, and homeless families.

Q & ADiscussion

Marketing Does It Apply to Counselors?

This session will:

  • Focus on “marketability,” a popular buzzword used by business professionals.
  • Define marketability.
  • Explore 10 ways to enhance the marketability of counselors.
  • Share resources for marketability and future projections in the area.
Gloria Dansby-Giles

Presented by: Gloria Dansby-Giles Ed.D., NCC, NCSC, NCCC, ACS, LPC

Dr. Dansby-Giles is a professor of counselor education at Jackson State University. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC), a National Certified Career Counselor (NCCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Dansby-Giles has served as southern regional vice president and ethics chair for the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). She has also served on the Mississippi Board of Examiners of Licensed Professional Counselors.

Q & ADiscussion

Leadership in the Counseling Profession: A Discussion Panel

Moderated by Dr. Michael Kocet, panelists Dr. Kristopher Goodrich and Dr. Shawn L. Spurgeon offer their views on the following discussion questions:

  • How did you begin your involvement in leadership roles within the counseling profession, particularly the American Counseling Association (ACA) and its divisions?
  • How have your leadership experiences impacted your professional identity and growth? What have been some challenges you have faced as a person of color/gay man as you have moved forward in leadership roles?
  • What are your recommendations for the doctoral minority fellows as they pursue their own leadership paths within ACA, its divisions and beyond?
Kristopher Goodrich

Kristopher Goodrich

Kristopher Goodrich is assistant professor of counselor education at the University of New Mexico. He graduated from Syracuse University in 2009 with a doctorate in counselor education and supervision, and has served in leadership capacities for ACA divisions and other counseling groups. Currently, Dr. Goodrich is the cochair of the LGBTQQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and allies) Affirmative Counseling and Social Justice Committee of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC); chair of the Chapter Development Committee for Chi Sigma Iota (CSI); and cochair of the New Faculty Interest Network, an interest group of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES).

Dr. Spurgeon

Shawn L. Spurgeon

Shawn L. Spurgeon is associate professor of counselor education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received his Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education in 2002 from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Spurgeon is currently the faculty advisor for the Upsilon Theta chapter of Chi Sigma Iota, a member of ACA’s 2014 Ethics Revision Task Force and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Counseling Research and Practice and the Journal of the Professional Counselor. He is president-elect for the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling (AARC), past cochair of the ACA Ethics Committee, and past treasurer for both the Association for Assessment in Counseling and Education (AACE) and CSI. He is the first recipient of the Courtland C. Lee Multicultural Excellence Scholarship Award.

Michael Kocet

Michael M. Kocet, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Michael M. Kocet is associate professor and department chair of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. He is a licensed mental health counselor and National Certified Counselor (NCC). Dr. Kocet served as a member of the ACA Ethics Committee from 2001 to 2007 and chaired the ACA Ethics Code Revision Task Force from 2002 to 2005. He is past president of ALGBTIC and a former board member for the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs and is sought after as a national speaker and consultant on ethical and LGBT issues in counseling. Dr. Kocet is a member of the NBCC MFP Advisory Council.

From Shaming to Sharing: Using Personal Privilege to Promote Cultural Empowerment and Advocacy

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Explore various forms of cultural privilege.
  • Identify the power dynamics of cultural privilege.
  • Address emotional reactions to the power play of cultural privilege such as denial, anger, hostility, guilt, resistance, etc.
  • Identify ways to neutralize emotional reactivity and work with personal privilege to promote cultural equality.
Michael Kocet

Presented by: Michael M. Kocet Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Kocet is associate professor and student affairs program director of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. Dr. Kocet earned his Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Arkansas and completed a graduate certificate in dispute resolution at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a licensed mental health counselor and a National Certified Counselor (NCC). His professional areas of interest include ethical issues in counseling; counseling gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender clients; and grief counseling. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on ethics and diversity issues. Dr. Kocet served as a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethics Committee (2001-2007) and as chair of the ACA Ethics Code Revision Taskforce (2002-2005). He is past president of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs, and is sought as a national speaker and consultant on ethical issues in counseling.

Q & ADiscussion

Culturally Informed Substance Abuse Counseling

This session will:

  • Explore the role of culture in conceptualizing and providing effective addictions counseling.
  • Describe approaches for providing culturally competent addictions counseling for diverse populations.
  • Identify different models of addictions counseling.
Phillip Clarke

Presented by: Phillip Clarke Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Dr. Clarke is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Wake Forest University, where he teaches courses on addictions and advanced counseling skills. Dr. Clarke is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in the state of North Carolina. His research and writing interests include wellness and development, substance abuse, supervision and teaching, and individuals diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers. He currently provides individual and group counseling for clients living with dementia and their caregivers at Wake Forest Baptist Health.

Q & ADiscussion

NBCC Foundation has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 805. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. NBCC Foundation is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

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