Innovations in Counseling

NBCC Foundation has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 805. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. NBCC Foundation is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


Bridging the Cultural Gap Between Korean Immigrant Parents and Their 1.5 and 2.0 Korean-American Children: Understanding Cultural Differences Between the East and the West

Immigration can be a difficult experience for anyone, but navigating two different worlds poses a threat when the two worlds are found to be antithetical to each other. Immigrant parents of Korean descent often transition to the U.S. with a singular goal in mind—to achieve the American Dream through and for their children—yet they are hardly prepared to face the realities of cultural conflicts that come as a direct result of their children's changing cultural identities. This webinar will contextualize immigration of Koreans within the backdrop of Korean history; dissect salient social and emotional issues Korean immigrant families face; pinpoint the inevitable cultural clash between the East and the West; and suggest bicultural identity as a healthy option of adjustment.

  • Increase understanding of salient issues impacting Korean immigrant families;
  • Become familiar with the cultural differences between the East and the West; and
  • Gain perspective on biculturalism and healthy cultural adjustment for Korean-American youth.

Josephine M. Kim, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Josephine M. Kim has a dual faculty appointment in the Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Dental Medicine and in the Prevention Science and Practice/CAS in Counseling at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is also on faculty at the Center for Cross-Cultural Student Emotional Wellness at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in the state of Massachusetts and a National Certified Counselor whose clinical skills and experiences span many contexts including residential facilities, hospitals, community agencies and public and private schools. She has provided professional consultation and expertise on multicultural, mental health and educational issues to various media sources in Asia and in the U.S. and is a former resident fellow in the Administrative Fellowship Program at the Office of the Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity and Equity at Harvard University. She is the director of diversity and inclusion at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and her research and practice focus on diversity, inclusion, equity, and bridging the cultural gap between immigrant generations and their 1.5 and 2.0 American children. She is the author of two bestselling books in Korea: The Secret of Children's Self-esteem: A Handbook for Parents and Self-esteem in the Classroom: A Handbook for Teachers.

Q & A

What Counselors Need to Know When Working With Transgender Men

How do transgender men experience their sexual orientation and gender identity during the transition process? Results of a qualitative study of these topics will be presented in this session, including portions of interviews with members of this population. From their words and their experiences, you will hear what transgender men believe we, as counselors, should know about their experiences. The session will conclude with an interactive discussion on the fluid and binary nature of sexual and gender identities in transgender men.

  • Working with the narratives of transgender men from a recent study, the intersectionality of gender and sexual identities will be discussed.
  • The webinar will include the stories of transgender men—how they see counseling, what they want counselors to know about them, and how they see themselves regarding sexual and gender identities.
  • The presentation will also address the fluid and binary nature of sexual and gender identities in transgender men.

William B. Baker, Ph.D.

William B. Baker recently earned a Ph.D. in counseling at Montclair State University and currently works as an adjunct professor in counselor education at Montclair State. Dr. Baker has been researching transgender men, with a focus on sexual orientation and gender identity issues and how these two constructs intersect. He is a strong advocate for LGBTQ persons and has recently been focusing on the “T,” transgender persons, who are often overlooked or misunderstood. Dr. Baker has 30 years of experience in education, which includes teaching, counseling and working with “at-risk” students in alternative and adult schools.

Dr. Baker received a M.A. in school counseling from Montclair State University. He is also a Licensed Associate Counselor (LAC) in the state of New Jersey. Dr. Baker has presented about transgender men at various counseling conferences and has recently presented in a corporate setting, BASF in New Jersey, about being inclusive with transgender employees.

Q & A

Spirituality in Clinical Practice

Historically, the relationship between religion/spirituality (R/S) in clinical practice has been tolerant at best and contentious at worst. In recent years, clinicians and researchers have recognized religion, spirituality and nonreligious beliefs to be important aspects of the identities and life experiences of many individuals, groups and families. In this webinar, we will explore the role and impact of religion, spirituality and nonreligious belief systems on people’s lives. We will also review ways to address R/S in counseling and psychotherapy, whether spirituality is at the core of the client’s presenting concern or R/S is an aspect of the client’s identity but not the presenting issue. Paramount to this work is each clinician’s awareness of their own R/S beliefs and journey as an aspect of competent, ethical and culturally responsive professional practice.

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of religion, spirituality and nonreligious belief systems to mental, physical and emotional health;
  • Describe how their own spiritual path influences their counseling practice; and
  • Identify at least three tools that can be used to address religious and spiritual issues with clients.

Kathy A. Gainor, Ph.D.

The Reverend Doctor Kathy A. Gainor is department chair and an associate professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Leadership at Montclair State University in Montclair, New Jersey. Additionally, Dr. Gainor is a Minister of Spiritual Consciousness ordained by the Inner Visions Institute for Spiritual Development under the tutelage of the Rev. Dr. Iyanla Vanzant.

Dr. Gainor holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Michigan State University, an M.A. in counseling psychology from Boston College and a B.A. in psychology from Waynesburg College (PA). She is a licensed psychologist in New Jersey with more than 30 years of experience providing psychotherapy, counseling, coaching, and advising services, primarily to adults in university settings. Her research interests have focused on spirituality and religion in counseling practice as an aspect of multicultural counseling and development, vocational and career development, and counselor andragogy and training.

As a counselor educator, Dr. Gainor has taught courses in multicultural counseling and development, counseling theories, counseling skills, group work, career counseling, professional orientation and ethics, and community resources, and provides supervision to practicum and internship students. She has developed and teaches a graduate-level course, Spirituality in Counseling Practice, in which students explore their own spiritual journey as they develop spiritual counseling competence.

Q & A

Developing Resiliency Skills in Clients

Increasing resiliency skills is valuable for every client and provider. The ability to “bounce back” from challenges allows for personal growth and change to occur. Everyone has challenges and strengths; the key is to identify both. The holidays often pose certain risks to clients and counselors due to increased time with family, pressure to meet expectations, and economic tensions.

Participants in this workshop will learn how to:

  • Identify core resiliency skills.
  • “Mine” resiliency skills with specific questions.
  • Help clients identify their unique holiday stressors and use resiliency methods to lessen them.

Mary E. Jones, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, LMFT

Mary E. Jones has over 30 years of experience in both counselor education and clinical practice. She has worked in private practice, public agency, hospital and college settings. Her areas of expertise are in resiliency, relationships, anxiety and depression, grief, and women’s health. She is licensed as both a professional counselor and a marriage and family therapist in the state of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones has bachelor’s degrees in public relations and human geography and a master’s degree in counseling and human resource development from South Dakota State University. She has a doctorate in counseling and psychology in education from the University of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones currently resides in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and is a consultant as well as an adjunct faculty member for Capella University in the Master’s in Mental Health Counseling program. Her interest and experience in resiliency has led her to present at both national and international venues.

Q & A

Considerations for Assessment, Diagnosis and Counseling of Teenagers with Addiction Issues

This webinar will focus on assessment of individuals presenting for counseling and determining if a substance use disorder is present using DSM-5 criteria and other considerations. Diagnostic considerations discussed will include developmental issues and concerns, cultural elements, and other relevant issues. Participants will discuss pros and cons of diagnosis, including stigma and client motivation.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders.
  • Learn about other signs and symptoms of problematic substance use.
  • Consider assessment and diagnostic implications for counseling.

Kevin Doyle, Ed.D., LPC, LSATP

Dr. Kevin Doyle is a professor and co-coordinator of the Counselor Education program at Longwood University, in Farmville, Virginia, where he has taught for the past four years. Prior to that, he taught for 14 years as an adjunct professor at the University of Virginia. He holds an Ed.D. in counselor education from the University of Virginia, an Ed.S. in counseling psychology from James Madison University, and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary.

Before entering academia full-time, he worked in various addiction treatment programs for the previous 26 years, including residential, outpatient, and inpatient settings. Licensed as professional counselor and as a substance abuse treatment practitioner in Virginia, he has served three terms on the Commonwealth of Virginia Board of Counseling, including two terms as board chair. His professional and research interests include counseling ethics, college students in recovery and counseling athletes.

Dr. Doyle has published numerous articles in professional publications and presents frequently at the state and national levels and serves on the editorial boards of two professional journals. He maintains a small private practice in Charlottesville, specializing in working with men, college students, and health care professionals with substance use disorders.

He resides in Charlottesville with his wife, with whom he has three children.

Q & A

Cultural Applications of Neurocounseling for Clinicians

This webinar aims at familiarizing clinicians with some advances in cultural neuroscience and deep culture concepts that impact counselors’ work, and the client/counselor relationship.

This session will help participants:

  • Become familiar with cultural neuroscience concepts useful in counselors’ work.
  • Gain understanding of the concept of deep culture and its impact on brain development.
  • Attain an appreciation of how the counselor/client connection is strengthened by greater (conscious) cultural understanding.
  • Learn some physiological “universals” that clinicians can use to help clients manage arousal.

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez is a core faculty member in the Counselor Education program at Walden University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher, and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education; program development; research activities; cross-cultural consultation; and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after growth experiences, and the neurobiology of connection as it relates to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia.

Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals and has delivered presentations at regional, national and international conferences.

Q & A

Identifying Issues and Finding Solutions: Navigating Clinical Supervision

There are many variables for clinical supervisors to consider when intervening with a supervisee. This webinar will offer a structure to help supervisors assess issues correctly and to choose corresponding interventions. Examples will be provided that underscore possible challenges to effective supervision.

The objectives of this session are to:

  • Provide beginning and experienced supervisors with a conceptual map for considering different aspects of supervision.
  • Explain how different aspects of supervision are intertwined.
  • Prepare supervisors to better assess the situation in supervision and choose appropriate interventions.

Janine M. Bernard, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LMHC

Janine M. Bernard is professor emeritus of counseling and counselor education at Syracuse University, in New York. Prior to her appointment at Syracuse University, she held positions at Purdue University and Fairfield University. Dr. Bernard received her undergraduate degree in English literature from Stonehill College, a master’s in counseling from the University of Connecticut, and her doctoral degree in counseling and counselor education from Purdue University, where she later received the Award of Distinction as an alumna. She is a National Certified Counselor, an Approved Clinical Supervisor, and is licensed in New York as a mental health counselor. Dr. Bernard served on NBCC’s Board of Directors from 1993–1999. She is a Fellow of the American Counseling Association (ACA), has been awarded the Alfred A. Hitchcock Distinguished Professional Service Award from ACA, and was recently chosen as a Legacy Award recipient by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

Dr. Bernard is the author of the widely used Discrimination Model of supervision and has published numerous articles and book chapters in the area of clinical supervision. Her co-authored text (with Rodney Goodyear), Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision, is now in its 5th edition. Dr. Bernard has made presentations on a variety of topics in supervision throughout the U.S. and Canada, and in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

Q & A

Understanding Military Families: Principles, Culture and Interventions in the Counseling Process

The purpose of this webinar is to familiarize counselors with military families and the cultural complexities of particular minority groups within the military culture. The webinar will emphasize the different counseling needs of enlisted personnel and commissioned personnel.

This session will:

  • Familiarize civilian counselors with the complexities of military culture.
  • Help counselors to understand the multicultural competencies interventions most appropriate for military families.
  • Differentiate among cultural differences throughout the military.

Edil Torres Rivera, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

Edil Torres Rivera has a Ph.D. in counseling psychology with a concentration in multicultural counseling from the University of Connecticut, in Storrs. He is a professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus. Dr. Torres Rivera is native Puerto Rican with a career of over 20 years in counseling. This includes 12 years in the United States Army as a behavioral science specialist, where his work included substance abuse counseling and military families counseling during deployment.

Dr. Torres Rivera’s research interests are in multicultural counseling, group work, chaos theory, liberation psychology, indigenous counseling, Puerto Rican studies, identity development, and gang/prison-related behavior. Specifically, his primary research focuses on complexity and how indigenous healing techniques are a necessary component when working with ethnic minority populations in the United States. Dr. Torres has additional interests in studying the implications of social injustice and oppression in counseling and psychotherapy with ethnic minorities in the United States.

His community work includes consultation services to the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Council in Nevada, visiting professor to the Universidad del Valle, Guatemala, and director of the Graduate School of Education’s school counseling program in Singapore.

Q & A

Preventing Child and Adolescent Suicide: Myths, Risks and Protective Factors

This webinar will provide beginning and experienced counselors with the preliminary background information they need to begin assessing whether a child or adolescent client is either suicidal or potentially suicidal, so that suicide assessments and subsequent treatment plans can be as accurate as possible.

The objectives of this session are:

  • To present and discuss myths connected with child and adolescent suicide so that misinformation is not used in assessing whether a client is potentially suicidal.
  • To discuss risk factors that increase the risk of suicidal intentionality and to discuss the protective factors that reduce the risk of suicide attempts and completions.
  • Become familiar with several community-based recovery support groups.
  • To provide mental health counselors and other professionals with the information they need to recognize the suicidal profile so they might more easily identify potentially suicidal clients and develop treatment plans.

David Capuzzi, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

David Capuzzi is a graduate of Florida State University and licensed as a counselor in Oregon. He is certified by the National Board for Certified Counselors as a National Certified Counselor. Currently, Dr. Capuzzi is a core faculty member in the clinical mental health counseling degree program in counselor education and supervision at Walden University as well as a senior faculty associate in the Department of Counseling and Human Services at Johns Hopkins University. He is professor emeritus at Portland State University, in Portland, Oregon. From 2007–2009, he served as affiliate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is past president of the American Counseling Association (ACA).

A frequent keynote and workshop presenter at professional conferences and institutes, Dr. Capuzzi has also consulted with a variety of school districts and community agencies on initiating prevention and intervention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. He has facilitated the development of suicide prevention, crisis management and postvention programs in communities throughout the United States; provides training on the topics of youth at risk, grief and loss, group work and other topics; and serves as an invited adjunct faculty member at other universities as time permits. He is the first recipient of ACA's Kitty Cole Human Rights Award and a recipient of the Leona Tyler Award in Oregon. He was inducted as an ACA fellow in 2008, and was the 2010 recipient of ACA’s Kathleen and Gilbert Wrenn Award for a Humanitarian and Caring Person. In 2011, he was named a Distinguished Alumnus by the College of Education at Florida State University.

Dr. Capuzzi has co-authored or co-edited 10 textbooks used in counselor education programs.

Q & A

Working with Clients With Substance Use Disorders: A Counselor’s Perspective

In this webinar, participants will be presented with an overview of substance use disorders by an experienced clinician and counselor educator. Topics to be covered include diagnosis using DSM-5 criteria, a review of how and where treatment is provided, pros and cons of common self-help recovery groups, and how to intervene with an individual exhibiting signs of a substance abuse problem.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders.
  • Learn about various treatment modalities and settings.
  • Become familiar with several community-based recovery support groups.
  • Explore how to intervene with a person exhibiting signs of a substance use problem.

Kevin Doyle, Ed.D., LPC, LSATP

Dr. Kevin Doyle is a professor and co-coordinator of the Counselor Education program at Longwood University, in Farmville, Virginia, where he has taught for the past four years. Prior to that, he taught for 14 years as an adjunct professor at the University of Virginia. He holds an Ed.D. in counselor education from the University of Virginia, an Ed.S. in counseling psychology from James Madison University, and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary.

Before entering academia full-time, he worked in various addiction treatment programs for the previous 26 years, including residential, outpatient, and inpatient settings. Licensed as professional counselor and as a substance abuse treatment practitioner in Virginia, he has served three terms on the Commonwealth of Virginia Board of Counseling, including two terms as board chair. His professional and research interests include counseling ethics, college students in recovery and counseling athletes.

Dr. Doyle has published numerous articles in professional publications and presents frequently at the state and national levels and serves on the editorial boards of two professional journals. He maintains a small private practice in Charlottesville, specializing in working with men, college students, and health care professionals with substance use disorders.

He resides in Charlottesville with his wife, with whom he has three children.

Q & A

An Introduction to Publishing in Peer-Reviewed Journals

Publishing can be a daunting process, yet peer-reviewed published research improves the effectiveness of counseling and counselor education. Without knowing where to begin, new counselor educators, graduate students and clinicians often stumble through the process, or choose not to publish significant works. Taking the fear and confusion out of the publication process, this webinar will provide an explanation of the publication process, tips for successful submission, and specifics on how to create manuscripts from theses and dissertations.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to choose the appropriate publication for their work.
  • Learn more about the publication process, including timelines and appropriate communication.
  • Learn how to best communicate with journal editors and editorial board members.
  • Learn how to create manuscripts from current work products.

Edina Renfro-Michel, Ph.D., ACS, LPC

Edina Renfro-Michel is an associate professor of counseling in the department of counseling and educational leadership at Montclair State University, in New Jersey. She obtained her Ph.D. in counselor education at Mississippi State University and both her B.A. in elementary education with a specialty in early childhood education and her M.A. in human services counseling at the University of New Orleans. Dr. Renfro-Michel is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey and an Approved Clinical Supervisor. She is the current secretary for the North Atlantic Region of the Association of Counselor Education and Supervision (NARACES).

Dr. Choudhuri is a licensed professional counselor in Connecticut and Michigan with over 15 years of experience working with clients individually, as well as in couples, families and groups. She is a National Certified Counselor and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor credential. She is also a consultant and frequent presenter on cultural competence, diversity and ethical issues. Clinically, she specializes in cross-cultural and diversity issues, as well as trauma, assault and abuse. Her clinical experience has been in agency and university settings, working with refugee populations, sexual assault and abuse survivors, and immigrant and multicultural populations.

Dr. Renfro-Michel has presented and published on her research interests in attachment theory, technology, supervision and counselor education pedagogy. She is the co-editor of the recently published book Using Technology to Enhance Clinical Supervision.

Culturally Competent Trauma-Informed Care

This webinar will examine the ways in which cultural competence is essential for working effectively with trauma. Awareness, knowledge and sensitivity to the cultural contexts in which trauma occurs, ways in which the experience of trauma can be culturally constructed, and the role of historical and intergenerational trauma will be covered. The use of a case study ensures the presentation is grounded in clinical strategies and skills that participants can use.

After this session, participants will:

  • Understand the ways in which cultural identities and worldview intersect with trauma and the role of multiple identities.
  • Understand how cultural competence in trauma work is enhanced by increased awareness of both the client and clinician's cultural identities.
  • Be able to apply culturally competent strategies to trauma assessment; making meaning; and addressing issues of shame, guilt and anger
  • Understand and be able to use trauma reenactment through grounding and resourcing.

Devika Dibya Choudhuri, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Devika Dibya Choudhuri is professor of clinical mental health counseling at the University of Saint Joseph, in Connecticut. She previously held a position as a professor in Eastern Michigan University’s graduate program in counseling. Originally from India, she completed her undergraduate work at Smith College, her M.S. in counseling at the University of Vermont, and her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision at Syracuse University. She is past Chair of the National Board for Certified Counselors Board of Directors. She has been a member of the American Counseling Association, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, and Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development for almost 20 years.

Dr. Choudhuri is a licensed professional counselor in Connecticut and Michigan with over 15 years of experience working with clients individually, as well as in couples, families and groups. She is a National Certified Counselor and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor credential. She is also a consultant and frequent presenter on cultural competence, diversity and ethical issues. Clinically, she specializes in cross-cultural and diversity issues, as well as trauma, assault and abuse. Her clinical experience has been in agency and university settings, working with refugee populations, sexual assault and abuse survivors, and immigrant and multicultural populations.

As a counselor educator, she teaches courses such as cross-cultural counseling, advanced multicultural counseling, counseling skills, group work, couple and family counseling, and counseling women and LGBT populations.

Dr. Choudhuri’s research and publications have focused on the areas of multicultural client issues, counselor supervision and pedagogy. She has published a textbook on multicultural counseling and edited a set of eight monographs to go along with the textbook. She has written many journal articles and book chapters on these topics, and has given numerous presentations nationally and internationally.

Q & A

Neurobiology for Professional Counselors

Dr. Allen Ivey will present basics of neurobiology as they apply to the practice of counseling, with special attention to social justice, as well as the dangers and implications of stress on the brain and body. He will discuss the Mankato Nun Study and the importance of a healthy lifestyle for living longer and preventing Alzheimer’s. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) focuses on 20 specific actions for wellness.

During this session, participants will learn:

  • Some key basics of neurobiology as they relate to counseling practice.
  • How neurobiology informs social justice and calls us to action.
  • How stress impacts the brain and body and the reasons to make stress management more central in practice.
  • The implications of the Mankato Nun Study for daily practice and living.
  • How to incorporate Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) in daily counseling and clinical practice.

Allen E. Ivey, Ed.D.

Allen E. Ivey is distinguished university professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and professor of counseling at the University of South Florida, in Tampa. His undergraduate university was Stanford, followed by a Fulbright year studying social work and social justice issues in Denmark. He holds a doctorate from Harvard. Dr. Ivey founded and directed the counseling centers at both Bucknell University and Colorado State University. He is the author or coauthor of more than 200 articles and 40 books translated into 25 languages, and has produced many video demonstrations. He and his wife, Mary, have presented workshops and keynote addresses throughout the nation and internationally.

Dr. Ivey is known for his work in college student development, the microcounseling framework, developmental counseling and therapy theory and practice, and his early work in neuroscience and its application in counseling. Multicultural issues have always been a central focus for Dr. Ivey, and he held his first workshop on racism in 1967 in Los Angeles. He was active in a group that worked for 20 years to ensure that the multicultural competencies and guidelines were adopted by both the American Counseling Association and American Psychological Association.

Q & A

Counseling Transgender Clients

Transgender and transsexual clients deserve competent, culturally and contextually relevant care to help cope with institutionalized marginalization, stigmatization and oppression. This webinar will offer practical strategies for supporting mental health and wellness, from a holistic qualitative assessment process to continued psychotherapeutic care. Attention will be paid to recommendations and standards set forth by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, with special focus on the specific counseling needs and integrative care to support wellness for transgender and transsexual persons.

During this session, participants will learn about:

  • Qualitative, whole-person assessments of transgender and transsexual clients.
  • Culturally and contextually relevant care for transgender and transsexual clients.
  • Issues of transition.
  • Wraparound care and support for transgender clients.

Jason Patton, Ph.D., LPC

Jason Patton received his Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision at St. Mary's University, in San Antonio, Texas. He received his M.A. in professional counseling from Texas State University, in San Marcos. He is a licensed professional counselor in Georgia. Dr. Patton engages relational cultural theory and critical pedagogy in practice and teaching. His clinical work and research interests center on clients of gender and sexual diversity, transgender body migration, trauma and the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, abuse, relational concerns, depression, anxiety, and other issues.

Dr. Patton has held leadership roles for a number of professional organizations and a position on the editorial board of the Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality. He has presented at a number of national conferences, including those of the American Counseling Association, the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling, and the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision. He has published in several professional journals and authored chapters in a number of textbooks. Dr. Patton is a core faculty member and the field experience coordinator of Walden University’s Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision program, as well as a member of the institutional review board. His passion for field experience extends from a commitment to ensuring the best care for clients, as well as advancing his students’ professional orientations—mentoring them to excel in their careers.

Q & A

Counseling Military Service Members and Their Families

The recent military engagements in Afghanistan and Iraq and subsequent drawdown in forces have created unique circumstances for military service members and their families. Repeated and unpredictable deployments present a unique constellation of concerns within the military family.

Mental health and physical concerns such as post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury can significantly impact the well-being of our military population. Awareness of the experience of military service members and their families and the issues they encounter is imperative for the provision of quality services. This webinar will provide information related to the unique experience of military service members and their families.

Participants will receive information on the prevalent concerns and associated counseling interventions that can address the mental health needs of this population. Participants will also be directed to appropriate resources to gain further knowledge of effective strategies to support military service members and their families.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the unique experience of military service members and their families.
  • Receive information about common concerns of this population as they relate to counseling.
  • Gain exposure to counseling interventions that can support military service members and their families.

Seth C.W. Hayden, Ph.D., NCC, CCMHC, ACS, LPC

Seth C.W. Hayden is assistant professor of counseling at Wake Forest University. Dr. Hayden has provided career and personal counseling in community agencies, secondary school and university settings. Dr. Hayden’s research and clinical work focus on the career and personal development of military service members, veterans and their families. In addition, he explores the connection between career and mental health issues as well as integrated models of clinical supervision designed to facilitate positive growth in counselors’ ability to formulate interventions. Dr. Hayden is past-president of the Military and Government Counseling Association and chair of the research committee for the National Career Development Association, both divisions of the American Counseling Association.

Dr. Hayden received his Bachelor of Arts in psychology, Bachelor of Science in education, and Master of Science in counseling from the University of Memphis. He completed his doctoral work in counselor education and supervision at the University of Virginia. Dr. Hayden is a licensed professional counselor in Virginia and is credentialed as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) through NBCC. He also holds the Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) from the Center for Credentialing & Education.

Q & A

Counseling Same-Sex Couples

This webinar will present participants with interventions to use with same-sex/same-gender couples. It will be presented from an empowerment model, not a deficit model. Participants will be educated about terminology relevant to same-sex/same-gender couples. The presenter will discuss the importance of building a strong empathic bond with the couple, being careful not to belittle the relationship, as well as ways to facilitate communication in the relationship. The presenter will also discuss the impact of the legalization of same-sex marriage, premarital counseling, and statistical data regarding same-sex/same-gender marriage. The presentation will cover adoption, sexual roles and infectious diseases.

During this session, participants will learn about:

  • How various characteristics (length of relationship, age of the people involved, family dynamics, sexual roles, etc.) impact same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The importance of empathy, understanding and encouragement in the counselor/client relationship when working with same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The impact of marriage and children on same-sex/same-gender couples.
  • The impact of infectious diseases on same-sex/same-gender couples.

David Julius Ford Jr., Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

David Julius Ford Jr. has a B.A. in psychology and an M.A. in clinical mental health counseling, both from Wake Forest University. In May 2014, he earned his Ph.D. in education with a concentration in counselor education and supervision at Old Dominion University. Dr. Ford is a licensed professional counselor in North Carolina and is also seeking licensure in Virginia. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Ford recently completed his first year as an assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Graduate Psychology at James Madison University, where he serves as the faculty adviser to the Nu Lambda chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and the Contemporary Gospel Singers of JMU.

Dr. Ford’s professional interests are Greek life; multicultural issues; college students; African-American males in higher education; addictions counseling; supervision; group work; qualitative research; the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual (LGBTQQIA) community; and persons living with HIV/AIDS. He has experience as an instructor for undergraduate human services courses and has taught graduate course on career counseling, testing and assessment, clinical mental health counseling, and group counseling. He has also taught a doctoral-level dissertation course. He is one of 24 inaugural fellows of the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Ford is a classically trained pianist and is a proud and active member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. As an undergraduate, he had the privilege of taking a class taught by the late Dr. Maya Angelou. Dr. Ford currently lives in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 3: Peshawar Trauma Project (A Case Study)

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 3 of this three-part webinar will discuss a case study. The Peshawar trauma project was implemented singlehandedly in the aftermath of the December 16, 2014, Taliban attack on a school in Peshawar, Pakistan. The attack resulted in the brutal execution of 152 people, 132 of whom were children ages 7–17. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how crowdfunding and personal fundraising efforts were utilized to finance the project.
  • Learn more about the implementation of the project from start to finish.
  • Learn about the in-vivo method of service delivery and training delivery that allowed for maximum use of limited time and resources.
  • Learn about therapeutic methods used and therapeutic outcomes during the project.
  • Learn about the future direction of this and other projects.

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 2: Building Emotional Resilience

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 2 of this three-part webinar will focus on building emotional resilience. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to help clients identify inner strengths.
  • Learn how to employ culturally specific belief systems to enhance emotional strength and resiliency.
  • Learn how to utilize an eclectic mix of therapeutic interventions to generate new neural pathways and build neural plasticity, leading to increased emotional resilience.

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Q & ADiscussion

Trauma Counseling: Helping Clients Cope With War and Natural Disaster—Part 1: Brief Interventions

In events such as war and natural disaster, affected individuals can experience an intense feeling of impotence and loss of self-efficacy. The resulting trauma can have both acute and chronic implications. If the triggering events, as in the case of war, are ongoing, it further intensifies the traumatic experience. Complicated grief, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, elevated stress response, anger and depression are some potential co-occurring presenting complaints.

What are some ways that therapists can make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who live with war as an everyday reality? This three-part webinar series will discuss therapeutic interventions that are effective in building emotional resilience and providing relief when working with individuals who find themselves inextricably caught in locations affected by war or natural disaster.

Part 1 of this three-part webinar will focus on brief interventions in trauma counseling. During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the stress response and its different stages.
  • Learn how to assess a client for stress response.
  • Learn about basic scaling during therapeutic intervention.
  • Learn how to effectively deactivate stress response.
  • Learn to identify when a client is past the stress response state and in a learning state.
  • Learn several brief interventions effective in trauma counseling.

Shahnaz Khawaja M.A., NCC, LPC, LCASA

Shahnaz Khawaja has a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Wake Forest University. At present, she holds the position of senior program officer for the NBCC Foundation. Before coming to NBCC, she spent several years working in addictions counseling at Insight Human Services, and as the director of counseling services at Greensboro College. Ms. Khawaja also maintains a private counseling practice.

Prior to earning her graduate degree, Ms. Khawaja served on the board of the American Red Cross High Point/Thomasville chapter and as a member of the ethics committee for the Thomasville Medical Center. She currently serves as a human relations commissioner for the city of High Point and the public relations committee chair for the Association for Humanistic Counseling. She is a National Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor and licensed clinical addictions specialist associate in the state of North Carolina.

Ms. Khawaja was born in Uganda, East Africa, and has travelled extensively. She continues to do relief work internationally. She moved to the United States in 1998 and has lived in High Point, North Carolina, since 2001.

Discussion

Group and Cultural Dynamics of Suicide

How can a counselor identify the different group or cultural dynamics that can influence a client at risk for suicide? This webinar will demonstrate how to determine suicidal lethality and possible risk to others within these group dynamics. Participants will also become more aware of professional bias and its effect on their ability to provide a suicide intervention. The goal of the webinar is to increase overall awareness of group and cultural influence and its relationship to success in treatment, prevention and intervention of a suicidal client.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to identify different groups and their influence on a client at risk for suicide.
  • Assess key significant characteristics of specific group dynamics and their influence on suicidal lethality and possible eminent danger to the client or others.
  • Increase personal awareness of professional group bias and how it can affect the ability to help a client at risk for suicide.

Eleanor Hamm, M.A., NCC, LPC

Eleanor Hamm worked for 40 years as the executive director of the Pueblo Suicide Prevention Center, in Colorado, during which time she lectured and trained professionals on suicide prevention and crisis intervention on a state, national and international level. She was a national accreditation examiner for the American Association of Suicidology for 30 years and one of the founding developers of the Colorado State Suicide Coalition. Ms. Hamm is a licensed professional counselor and National Certified Counselor. She holds a master’s in counseling from Adams State University in Alamosa, Colorado.

Discussion

Multicultural Counseling Competencies

The intent of this one-hour webinar is to reintroduce the social justice aspects of the Multicultural Counseling Competencies of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD). Section E.5.b of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics states that counselors have an ethical obligation to provide multiculturally competent services. Counselors are also ethically bound to advocate with and on behalf of clients at the individual, group, institutional and societal levels should such situations arise, as stated in Section A.7.a. Therefore, multiculturally competent counseling must be inclusive of social justice. It must provide equal access and opportunity, be inclusive, and remove individual and systemic barriers to fair mental health services.

During this session, participants will:

  • Clearly connect social justice with multicultural competence.
  • Discuss critical thinking skills and how these skills are necessary to analyze inequities.
  • Develop ways to incorporate social justice interventions into one’s practice.

Michael Brooks, Ph.D., NCC

Michael Brooks is associate professor of counselor education at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro. Dr. Brooks earned a master’s and doctoral degree in counselor education from the University of Central Florida in Orlando. He has presented in the areas of multiculturalism and multicultural competency, ethics relating to diversity, school counselor effectiveness, professional development school models, and mentoring at several regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Brooks has also served on nationally televised panels to discuss HIV and substance abuse.Dr. Brooks has an extensive publication record in several counseling flagship journals, as well as publications in multicultural education and student affairs journals. He has one edited textbook, on black male success, and several authored book chapters. Prior to a beginning a career in higher education, Dr. Brooks worked as a county government mental health counselor. He has been the president of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and the Alabama Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

Discussion

Preparing Counselors of Color: Addressing Differences in Counselor Education and Supervision Practice

People of color make up a small percentage of both those receiving mental health and addiction services and of mental health practitioners (e.g., counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers). Due to the disparity among mental health practitioners of color and the patient population, education, training and supervision in cultural competence are imperative. As counselor educators who mainly educate and supervise counselors of color (COCs) and counseling students of color (CSOCs), the presenters have found that they have unique areas of cultural competence that need to be addressed. Several CSOCs report ill feelings, anger and even depression as it relates to experiences in which they have been discriminated against, oppressed and treated unfairly because of their race. Some report negative interracial relationships, experiences and media messages, which may result in mistrust, dislike, envy and even hatred of whites and other people of color. Some mental health professionals also face challenges in educating and supervising COCs and CSOCs due to their own level of cultural competence and lack of training in addressing these issues.

This webinar will provide knowledge, strategies and techniques that will assist counselors, supervisors and counselor educators who work with CSOCs as well as address potential barriers. Furthermore, this webinar will briefly outline the results of a review of multicultural textbooks used in counseling programs and their inclusion of content specifically targeted at developing the unique areas of cultural competence for CSOCs.

In this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the unique areas of cultural competence that counselors of color (COCs) and counseling students of color (CSOCs) face.
  • Become familiar with strategies and techniques that will be helpful in assisting COCs and CSOCs to navigate the challenges they might have in working with whites and/or other people of color.
  • Learn about ways to address the barriers that COCs face when training and supervising.
  • Be introduced to the research findings of the review of multicultural textbooks that may be helpful in preparing COCs and CSOCs with their development as culturally competent practitioners.

Kyla Marie Kurian, Ph.D., NCC

Kyla Marie Kurian is an assistant professor at North Carolina Central University, where she teaches in the counselor education program in the Department of Allied Health Professions. Dr. Kurian earned her doctorate in counseling from North Carolina State University. Following graduation, Dr. Kurian spent three years as a National Institute on Drug Abuse postdoctoral fellow, where she received advanced training in the research areas of substance abuse and HIV interventions. Dr. Kurian’s research focuses on understanding the effects of oppression on the identity development of black and Coloured South African women and addressing the differences in preparing counselors of color in counselor education and supervision practice.

Dr. Kurian was awarded a Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) grant from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to adapt an evidence-based HIV intervention for African-American college women. Most recently, Dr. Kurian headed a team of researchers who were awarded a 2014 Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) research grant.

Q & ADiscussion

Understanding Diversity in Teaching and Program Evaluation

According to a 2014 special report by USA Today, analysis of census data reveals a one-in-two chance that the next individual you encounter in a public setting such as work or a store will be from a race or ethnic group different from your own. As counselors, we need to understand diversity in teaching in terms of the responsibilities identified in the 2012 NBCC Code of Ethics, the 2014 American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP) 2009 Standards.

During this session, participants will:

  • Discuss the importance of diversity in teaching and program evaluation.
  • Examine diversity in teaching and program evaluation as it relates to the 2012 NBCC Code of Ethics, the 2014 ACA Code of Ethics and the 2009 CACREP Standards.
  • Identify, compare and evaluate the appropriateness of multicultural training experiences.
  • Identify useful strategies for experiencing challenging student responses to multicultural sensitivity and awareness.
  • Apply information related to diversity in teaching and program evaluation through the use of scenarios.
  • Examine future directions for diversity in teaching and program evaluation.

Gloria Dansby-Giles, Ed.D., NCC, NCSC, NCCC, ACS, LPC

Gloria Dansby-Giles is professor of counselor education at Jackson State University, in Mississippi. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC), a National Certified Career Counselor (NCCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Dansby-Giles has served on the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program Advisory Council and as southern regional vice president and ethics chair for the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). She has also served on the Mississippi Board of Examiners for Licensed Professional Counselors.

Dr. Dansby-Giles has received numerous awards for teaching, including the Faculty Excellence Award, the Innovators Award and three College of Education teaching awards. Other notable recognition includes the Higher Education Appreciation Day, Working for Academic Excellence from the Mississippi state legislature and the Teaching Effectiveness Award.

Phillip Clarke, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Dr. Clarke is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Wake Forest University, where he teaches courses on addictions and advanced counseling skills. Dr. Clarke is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in the state of North Carolina. His research and writing interests include wellness and development, substance abuse, supervision and teaching, and individuals diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers. He currently provides individual and group counseling for clients living with dementia and their caregivers at Wake Forest Baptist Health.

Q & ADiscussion

Promoting the Intersectionality of Multicultural and LGBTQ Competency

A key component to forming our professional ethical identity is maintaining appropriate multicultural competency as professional counselors. Within the profession of counseling, there currently exist important competency documents that guide counseling practices with multicultural populations, spirituality issues, and LGBTQ individuals. This webinar will help participants to learn the framework for defining counseling competency and recognize the importance of viewing cultural competency as the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, ability, gender/gender identity, and sexual orientation. Participants will identify strategies to integrate the various competency models in order to promote best practices with LGBTQ clients and students.

During this session, participants will:

  • Examine the intersectionality of the multicultural and the LGBTQ competencies when counseling LGBTQ individuals from diverse backgrounds.
  • Explore the training needs for counselors working with the LGBTQ population.
  • Identify strategies for addressing potential value conflicts and ethical issues that may exist in counseling LGBTQ individuals.
  • Discuss strategies for increasing professional competency when working with this population.

Michael M. Kocet, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Kocet is associate professor and student affairs program director of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. Dr. Kocet earned his Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Arkansas and completed a graduate certificate in dispute resolution at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a licensed mental health counselor and a National Certified Counselor (NCC). His professional areas of interest include ethical issues in counseling; counseling gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender clients; and grief counseling. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on ethics and diversity issues. Dr. Kocet served as a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethics Committee (2001-2007) and as chair of the ACA Ethics Code Revision Taskforce (2002-2005). He is past president of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs, and is sought as a national speaker and consultant on ethical issues in counseling.

Q & ADiscussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 3)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

This third webinar focuses on disorders common in the practice of mental health counselors, including some disorders new to the DSM-5. Several disorders will be covered in more depth, including autism spectrum; schizophrenia spectrum; and bipolar, depressive, anxiety, trauma-based, and substance use and addictive disorders. The presentation will also include an enhanced focus on the use of cross-cutting symptom and severity measures and a review of best practices in diagnosing and preparing for treatment.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the salient diagnostic criteria of common DSM-5 mental disorders.
  • Describe how to use cross-cutting symptom and severity measures to strengthen assessment and clinical utility.
  • Identify at least two best-practice strategies in diagnosing and preparing for treatment-planning.

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Discussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 2)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

Part two will focus on specific assessment instruments related to the DSM-5 and how to creatively and effectively use them in practice. Unprecedented in the history of the DSM is the series of assessment instruments available to mental health clinicians on the companion Web site, www.psychiatry.org/dsm5. The discussion will feature specific assessment instruments, their utility and limitations, and suggestions for use, including sensitivity in their application. The presentation will also highlight specific instruments, including the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI), and some cross-cutting symptom severity measures, and provide examples of how some of these instruments are being used in clinical practice.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the uses of level 1 and level 2 cross-cutting measures, the WHODAS, and the Cultural Formulation Interview.
  • Identify two best practices in using the DSM-5 assessment measures.
  • Identify how they can utilize these assessment instruments to better inform diagnosis and treatment-planning.

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Q & ADiscussion

DSM-5: Exploring New Clinical Perspectives (Part 1)

The mental health professions are in the process of transitioning to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was developed to align with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and represents the most current research in the assessment and identification of mental disorders.

Part 1 will focus on basic changes to the DSM-5 and its clinical utility, including the shift from categorical to dimensional assessment, use of cross-cutting symptom and severity measures, elimination of the multiaxial format and development of a nonaxial diagnosis, and adoption of a spectrum perspective. The material will be presented from the perspective of professional counseling and how counselors can maintain a lifespan development and wellness perspective while working within this mental health nosology inherently embedded in the medical model. This presentation will serve as a foundation for future webinars on the assessment and diagnosis of specific mental disorders, treatment implications, and therapeutic factors in counseling interventions.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the major differences between categorical and dimensional approaches to diagnosis.
  • Describe how the DSM-5 provides clinical utility in regard to the process of assessing and diagnosing clients.
  • Identify two best-practice strategies for maintaining a counselor’s perspective while using the DSM-5.

Matt Buckley, Ed.D., NCC, ACS, DCC, LPC, LMHC

Matt Buckley received both his master’s in community counseling and his doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Idaho State University in Pocatello. He is a licensed professional counselor in Mississippi and Arkansas and a licensed clinical mental health counselor in Utah. Dr. Buckley has been a practicing counselor since 1993 and specializes in marriage and family, child and adolescent, and group counseling. He is a board-approved clinical supervisor in Mississippi and Arkansas, where he provides clinical supervision for other professional counselors and counselors-in-training. Dr. Buckley is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC). Dr. Buckley is a counselor educator at Walden University and the former program director for the M.S. in mental health counseling program. He previously served as division chair and associate professor of counselor education at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Buckley serves as an examination committee member for the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Q & ADiscussion

Preparing a Research Manuscript for Publication

This webinar focuses on the process of turning a research paper or conceptual paper into a manuscript suitable for publication. Participants will learn about key manuscript components, types of manuscripts, cover letters and finding a suitable venue for submission.

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the components of a manuscript suitable for publication.
  • Locate an appropriate publication for submission of their manuscript.
  • Understand the process of submission and review of their manuscript.

Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, CCMHC, LPC-Chair

Dr. Lopez-Baez is a professor in the counseling and educational leadership programs at Montclair State University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education, program development, research activities, consultation (cross-cultural), and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after "growth" experiences, and the neurobiology of connection related to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals, and has delivered multiple presentations at regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia. She is a member of ACA, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Honor Society.

Discussion

Finding Your Voice as a Social Justice Advocate

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Learn what social justice advocacy is and the aspects it encompasses.
  • Identify how their everyday work empowers nondominant groups.
  • Identify professional and personal strengths that transfer to advocacy work.
  • Learn strategies to become a stronger advocate.
  • Learn how to create an advocacy action plan.

Presented by: Jennifer M. CookPh.D., NCC, LPC

Jennifer M. Cook is assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology at Marquette University, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is a passionate multicultural counselor, educator, supervisor and researcher who infuses advocacy throughout her work. Dr. Cook has served clients, particularly underserved populations, in private practice and clinical mental health settings, and supervised school and clinical mental health counselors-in-training. Her research interests focus on counselor multicultural development, with particular emphasis on issues related to social class and socioeconomic status. Dr. Cook earned her Ph.D. in counselor education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and was proud to be selected for the 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program.

Q & ADiscussion

Managing Clients at Risk for Suicide or Violence: Legal and Ethical Issues

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand that it is important to use the term “may be risk” rather than “at risk;”
  • Appreciate the importance of following guidelines for dealing with potentially at-risk clients that have been established by their place of employment;
  • Articulate the reasons why involving immediate supervisors when clients may be at risk for suicide or violence is so important;
  • List options that are available to counselors when a determination is made that the client is not at risk for suicide;
  • Discuss procedures to follow when a client who may be risk for suicide or violence returns to the counselor for additional services.

Presented by: Theodore P. Remley Jr.Ph.D., J.D., NCC, LPC, LMFT

Theodore P. Remley Jr. is a professor of counseling at Our Lady of Holy Cross College in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Remley holds a Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Florida and a law degree from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a member of Chi Sigma Iota. He is licensed as a professional counselor in Virginia, Louisiana and Mississippi, and is licensed to practice law in Virginia and Florida. He is licensed as a marriage and family therapist in Louisiana. Dr. Remley is the author and co-author of a number of articles, books and book chapters related to legal and ethical issues in counseling. For more than a decade, he has directed very popular counselor institutes in Italy and Ireland, and in cooperation with NBCC International, in Bhutan; Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Malawi, Africa. In the past, Dr. Remley has held full-time counseling faculty positions at George Mason University, Mississippi State University, the University of New Orleans and Old Dominion University. Dr. Remley is a former executive director of the American Counseling Association.

Q & ADiscussion

Counseling African-American Male Substance Users

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify barriers to African-American male substance users' participation in counseling therapy and research.
  • Describe active coping and discuss its impact on African-American male behavior and assessments.
  • Identify strategies for addressing African-American males' active coping styles in a counseling setting.
  • Describe the influence of spirituality on African-American male substance users' core belief system behavior patterns.
  • List four factors related to substance use among African-American male substance users.
  • List four methods for engaging and retaining African-American male substance users in counseling and research.

Presented by: Robert A. HornePh.D, NCC, LPC, LCAS, CSI

Robert A. Horne holds a Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, a master's degree in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and a Master of Divinity from Duke University's Duke Divinity School. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and holds licenses in North Carolina as a licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical addiction specialist and clinical supervisor intern. Dr. Horne is a 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow and currently serves as a therapist in private practice. His research focuses on substance use, identity and spirituality among males of African descent. Dr. Horne has experience working with diverse populations and provides mental health and substance use training in multiple countries, including South Africa, Guyana and Jamaica.

Discussion

Grant-Writing 101

Writing a successful grant proposal is often essential to secure funding for research or direct service to benefit underserved minority populations. Join Sherry Allen, NBCC Foundation executive director, for this webinar and learn:

  • How to find funding opportunities.
  • Describe active coping and discuss its impact on African-American male behavior and assessments.
  • How to determine if a funding opportunity is right for you.
  • About the essential steps to a successful grant application.

Presented by: Sherry L. AllenM.Ed., NCC, CCMHC, LPC, GPC

Sherry Allen is the executive director of the NBCC Foundation, Inc., leading the program development, fund development and board facilitation of the newest affiliate of the National Board for Certified Counselors. Prior to her current position, Ms. Allen was the president and CEO of Youth & Family Services Network (YFSN), where she facilitated and administered the delivery of training, technical assistance, fund development and advocacy support services to youth services agencies throughout the country. Through her agency work and private practice, she has provided trainings and consultation throughout the United States and Western Europe, with an emphasis on leadership, cultural competency, board development, grant development and nonprofit organizational development. Ms. Allen was an examination development content expert for the Grant Professionals Certification Institute, and has administered many federal grants of local, regional and national scope. She is a facilitator of processes and planning methods for both the Institute of Cultural Affairs and the National Coalition Building Institute. Ms. Allen is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in Tennessee and North Carolina, and has practiced as an individual, couples and family counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

Becoming a Culturally Competent Counselor: A Process

Presented by Atsuko Seto and Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, in this session, participants will:

  • Learn a brief history of the development of the multicultural counseling competencies and relevant research.
  • Approach the competencies from a process-oriented perspective.
  • Explore and reflect on their own cultural and unique individual backgrounds and the impact of these elements.

Atsuko SetoPh.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

Atsuko Seto is an associate professor in the Department of Counselor Education at The College of New Jersey. She is the program coordinator of the educational specialist degree in marriage and family therapy program and the master’s in marriage, couple, and family counseling and therapy program, accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Dr. Seto is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). She holds a doctorate in counselor education from the University of Wyoming and a master's degree in counseling from Chadron State College, in Nebraska. Dr. Seto’s strong interest in multiculturalism and diversity in counseling began with her experience studying English as a second language (ESL) in the United States as an international student. Gaining insights into the potential impact of acculturative stressors, language barriers and race relations has fostered both her personal and professional growth while strengthening her commitment to lifelong learning.

At her clients’ request, Dr. Seto has provided counseling services to individuals and families in English and Japanese. Additionally, she has engaged in professional development at the global level. Dr. Seto assisted with the implementation of NBCC International’s Mental Health Facilitator (MHF) program in Japan, which was used to support survivors of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. She has also traveled to Rwanda to learn about the current state of the country and efforts to meet the population’s mental health needs. Dr. Seto’s scholarly activities include publications and presentations in the areas of counseling Asians and Asian Americans, intercultural couples, experiential multicultural counseling activities, and faculty professional development. Her recent publications include a coedited book titled Women’s Retreat: Voices of Female Faculty in Higher Education.

Sandra I. Lopez-BaezPh.D., NCC, ACS, CCMHC, LPC-Chair

Dr. Lopez-Baez is a professor in the counseling and educational leadership programs at Montclair State University. Over the past 30 years, she has been a counselor educator and supervisor, practicing clinician, researcher and consultant. Her work has included undergraduate- and graduate-level teaching, as well as medical education, program development, research activities, consultation (cross-cultural), and counseling individuals, couples and groups in a private practice setting. Her research interests include diversity, multicultural issues, outcome measurement after "growth" experiences, and the neurobiology of connection related to discrimination. Dr. Lopez-Baez has been an active participant in national, regional and state professional associations, serving as president of both the Ohio Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Counselors for Social Justice, a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has published in peer-reviewed journals, and has delivered multiple presentations at regional, national and international conferences. Dr. Lopez-Baez is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), as well as a licensed professional counselor in Ohio, Puerto Rico and Virginia. She is a member of ACA, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Honor Society.

Q & ADiscussion

The Humanness of Minority Clients

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Comprehend basic philosophical influences on the counseling relationship.
  • Identify fundamental principles in humanistic counseling.
  • Understand how humanistic principles can be useful for working with minority clients.
  • Consider biases and assumptions they assign to clients as a result of preconceived ideas and beliefs about a certain minority group.
  • Discuss ways in which one can integrate humanistic principles into the counseling relationship.

Presented by: Tyler Wilkinson Ph.D., NCC

Tyler Wilkinson holds a doctoral degree in counselor education and supervision from Auburn University, in Alabama. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), maintains a limited private practice and is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Wilkinson is interested in incorporating humanistic principles into counseling practice, counselor education and supervision. His other research interests include best practices for using technology in counseling and counselor education, couples counseling, and counseling student development.

Q & ADiscussion

Working With African-American Male Students in Schools

This session will help participants to:

  • Understand environmental pressures that can exist for African-American male students.
  • Examine interventions that can improve learning environments for African-American male students.
  • Examine individual and group counseling methods that are effective when working with African-American male students.

Presented by: Mark Eades M.A., LPCA, NCC

Mark Eades is a current doctoral student in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and holds a master’s degree in school counseling from Wake Forest University. He is a licensed school counselor and licensed professional counselor associate (LPCA) in North Carolina and is a National Certified Counselor (NCC). Mr. Eades enjoys working with students of all ages and has counseled students from kindergarten through graduate school in a variety of settings. He has a special interest in talking with students about multicultural considerations, family concerns, teacher-student relationships and career-personality matching.

Q & ADiscussion

Arab-American Perspectives on Counseling

Presented by Tahani Dari and Shadin Atiyeh, this session will help participants to:

  • Understand the diversity and shared values of Arab-American populations.
  • Conduct studies effectively with Arab-American populations.
  • Implement successful community-based interventions.
  • Adapt traditional therapeutic approaches to work with Arab-American populations.

Tahani Dari M.A., LLPC, NCC

Tahani Dari holds a master's degree in school counseling from Eastern Michigan University. She is a National Certified Counselor and holds a limited counseling license from the state of Michigan. Ms. Dari is a proficient speaker of Arabic. She is currently serving as a school counselor and assessment coordinator for K–12 students and as a private practitioner working with a broad spectrum of issues, including career development, college advising, depression, anxiety, stress and trauma. Ms. Dari has experience in various community settings serving low-income families, immigrants and refugees, and working with women's issues.

Shadin Atiyeh M.A., LLPC, NCC

Shadin Atiyeh holds a master's degree in community counseling from Eastern Michigan University. She is a National Certified Counselor and is a limited licensed counselor in the state of Michigan. Ms. Atiyeh speaks conversational Arabic, French and Spanish. She is currently working in private practice with a broad spectrum of issues, including trauma, depression, anxiety, stress, isolation and career development. She has experience working in various community agencies with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, immigrants and refugees, abused and neglected children, and homeless families.

Q & ADiscussion

Marketing Does It Apply to Counselors?

This session will:

  • Focus on “marketability,” a popular buzzword used by business professionals.
  • Define marketability.
  • Explore 10 ways to enhance the marketability of counselors.
  • Share resources for marketability and future projections in the area.

Presented by: Gloria Dansby-Giles Ed.D., NCC, NCSC, NCCC, ACS, LPC

Dr. Dansby-Giles is a professor of counselor education at Jackson State University. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC), a National Certified Career Counselor (NCCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). Dr. Dansby-Giles has served as southern regional vice president and ethics chair for the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). She has also served on the Mississippi Board of Examiners of Licensed Professional Counselors.

Q & ADiscussion

Leadership in the Counseling Profession: A Discussion Panel

Moderated by Dr. Michael Kocet, panelists Dr. Kristopher Goodrich and Dr. Shawn L. Spurgeon offer their views on the following discussion questions:

  • How did you begin your involvement in leadership roles within the counseling profession, particularly the American Counseling Association (ACA) and its divisions?
  • How have your leadership experiences impacted your professional identity and growth? What have been some challenges you have faced as a person of color/gay man as you have moved forward in leadership roles?
  • What are your recommendations for the doctoral minority fellows as they pursue their own leadership paths within ACA, its divisions and beyond?

Kristopher Goodrich

Kristopher Goodrich is assistant professor of counselor education at the University of New Mexico. He graduated from Syracuse University in 2009 with a doctorate in counselor education and supervision, and has served in leadership capacities for ACA divisions and other counseling groups. Currently, Dr. Goodrich is the cochair of the LGBTQQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and allies) Affirmative Counseling and Social Justice Committee of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC); chair of the Chapter Development Committee for Chi Sigma Iota (CSI); and cochair of the New Faculty Interest Network, an interest group of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES).

Shawn L. Spurgeon

Shawn L. Spurgeon is associate professor of counselor education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received his Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education in 2002 from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Spurgeon is currently the faculty advisor for the Upsilon Theta chapter of Chi Sigma Iota, a member of ACA’s 2014 Ethics Revision Task Force and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Counseling Research and Practice and the Journal of the Professional Counselor. He is president-elect for the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling (AARC), past cochair of the ACA Ethics Committee, and past treasurer for both the Association for Assessment in Counseling and Education (AACE) and CSI. He is the first recipient of the Courtland C. Lee Multicultural Excellence Scholarship Award.

Michael M. Kocet, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC

Michael M. Kocet is associate professor and department chair of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. He is a licensed mental health counselor and National Certified Counselor (NCC). Dr. Kocet served as a member of the ACA Ethics Committee from 2001 to 2007 and chaired the ACA Ethics Code Revision Task Force from 2002 to 2005. He is past president of ALGBTIC and a former board member for the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs and is sought after as a national speaker and consultant on ethical and LGBT issues in counseling. Dr. Kocet is a member of the NBCC MFP Advisory Council.

From Shaming to Sharing: Using Personal Privilege to Promote Cultural Empowerment and Advocacy

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Explore various forms of cultural privilege.
  • Identify the power dynamics of cultural privilege.
  • Address emotional reactions to the power play of cultural privilege such as denial, anger, hostility, guilt, resistance, etc.
  • Identify ways to neutralize emotional reactivity and work with personal privilege to promote cultural equality.

Presented by: Michael M. KocetPh.D., NCC, LMHC

Dr. Kocet is associate professor and student affairs program director of the Department of Counselor Education at Bridgewater State University. Dr. Kocet earned his Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Arkansas and completed a graduate certificate in dispute resolution at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a licensed mental health counselor and a National Certified Counselor (NCC). His professional areas of interest include ethical issues in counseling; counseling gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender clients; and grief counseling. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on ethics and diversity issues. Dr. Kocet served as a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethics Committee (2001-2007) and as chair of the ACA Ethics Code Revision Taskforce (2002-2005). He is past president of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC). He has presented at local, state and national conferences on counseling and student affairs, and is sought as a national speaker and consultant on ethical issues in counseling.

Q & ADiscussion

Culturally Informed Substance Abuse Counseling

This session will:

  • Explore the role of culture in conceptualizing and providing effective addictions counseling.
  • Describe approaches for providing culturally competent addictions counseling for diverse populations.
  • Identify different models of addictions counseling.

Presented by: Phillip ClarkePh.D., NCC, LPC

Dr. Clarke is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Wake Forest University, where he teaches courses on addictions and advanced counseling skills. Dr. Clarke is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor in the state of North Carolina. His research and writing interests include wellness and development, substance abuse, supervision and teaching, and individuals diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers. He currently provides individual and group counseling for clients living with dementia and their caregivers at Wake Forest Baptist Health.

Q & ADiscussion

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